Experts at MJBizConNEXT highlight cannabis industry’s move toward more mainstream acceptance

Experts at MJBizConNEXT highlight cannabis industry’s move toward more mainstream acceptance

Anat Baron, CEO of Stashwall, delivers her keynote address to kick off MJBizConNEXT. (Photo by Niki Chanthavong)

While there is still a long way to go before cannabis becomes totally mainstream, we may be seeing the end of the Wild West for marijuana businesses.

This overarching theme permeated predictions for the industry Wednesday as MJBizConNEXT opened at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans.

MJBizConNEXT and the inaugural Hemp Industry Daily Conference, running concurrently, are produced by Marijuana Business Daily.

The industry is growing – MJBizDaily is predicting the U.S. industry could hit $30 billion by 2023 – but marijuana companies will have to begin thinking about it in more traditional business terms to get their piece of the pie.

“This is becoming a normalized industry – and normalized forces are coming into play,” Chris Walsh, president of MJBizDaily, said during his general-session address, “10 Trends to Watch This Year and Beyond.”

The mainstreaming of cannabis

Scrappy, upstart marijuana firms still have a place in the industry, but companies are now finding themselves having to deal with business concerns associated with more traditional and established industries – such as managing growth and improving efficiencies to improve profitability.

At the same time, more mainstream businesses, particularly in the data and alcohol spaces, are dipping their toes into the market through strategic partnerships.

Look for these trends to grow as more states legalize cannabis and operations become professionalized.

And one of the biggest factors that may come into force over the next few years is branding.

“Even if you have the best product out there, you’re not going to be able to compete with those who have a better brand strategy than you,” Walsh said.

The further normalization of MJ businesses isn’t isolated to North America.

Acceptance and legalization of cannabis is happening around the globe.

The world map is starting to fill in as more countries make efforts toward legalization, and recent moves in East Asia, Europe and Africa make them worth watching.

By 2030, cannabis will be part of consumers’ daily lifestyles, according to Anat Baron, CEO of Stashwall and former executive at Mike’s Hard Lemonade, who delivered the keynote Wednesday.

The future is cannabis

If marijuana or hemp products are going to be sold in supermarkets, where and how will they be sold?

“Will it be an aisle, like gluten free at Whole Foods? Or will there be cannabis products on every aisle next to every product?” Baron asked attendees.

“Really, think about it not as something that is adjacent but as something that is mainstream and is a part of everything.”

And the time to start changing this thought process is now, she said, because it’s only a matter of time before the 800-pound gorillas pounce on this market with huge potential.

Jenel Stelton-Holtmeier may be reached at [email protected]

Published at Wed, 12 Jun 2019 21:23:49 +0000

Greenstar Announces Execution of Long Term Cannabis Flower Supply Agreement

Greenstar Announces Execution of Long Term Cannabis Flower Supply Agreement

Greenstar Biosciences Corp. (CSE: GSTR) is pleased to announce that its tenant partner in Washington State, Cowlitz County Cannabis Cultivation, Inc. , has signed a long-term supply agreement with Pat Dullanty, owner and operator of an 18 acre tier 3 outdoor grow facility located at 26425 S Rupp Rd, Cheney, Washington 99001. Pursuant to this new agreement, Cowlitz will have access to up to 25,000 pounds, dry weight, of high-quality flower annually. The facility has significant room for expansion in both land and available high-quality spring water and gives Cowlitz a strong and stable supply of cannabis flower for years to come. A video of the Dullanty facility is provided below:

https://youtu.be/lQ6MhlAZsjw

Greenstar is the owner of the property leases, brands and intellectual property of Cowlitz County Cannabis Cultivation Inc., a licensed cannabis producer and processor located in Washington State. Learn more about Greenstar at www.greenstarbiosciences.com.

Cowlitz is a leading producer, marketer and vendor in the Washington State recreational cannabis market. Known for sourcing high-quality cannabis sold at affordable prices to a broad and established consumer base, Cowlitz’s portfolio of branded products is available at approximately 20% of cannabis retailers throughout Washington State. Cowlitz brands include; Columbia Valley Private Reserve, Cowlitz Creeper, Cowlitz Gold, High Guys and Dab Dudes and they have seen steady growth in the past five years. Cowlitz exceeded $14M in revenue for the 2018 calendar year and is on pace to exceed that number again in 2019. A critical element of that success is the availability of, and the ability to source and procure quality raw material cannabis flower to feed their growing demand. This agreement helps ensure that Cowlitz will be able to meet that expected demand despite current shortages within the state and expected future supply fluctuations.

This news release does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any of the securities in the United States. The securities have not been and will not be registered under the United States Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “U.S. Securities Act”) or any state securities laws and may not be offered or sold within the United States unless registered under the U.S. Securities Act and applicable state securities laws, unless an exemption from such registration is available.

For further information please contact:

Greenstar Biosciences Corp.
Ralph Olson, CEO
Tel: (303) 807-4827

THE CSE HAS NOT REVIEWED AND DOES NOT ACCEPT RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ACCURACY OR ADEQUACY OF THIS RELEASE.

Forward Looking Statements

This news release contains forward-looking statements relating to the future operations of the Company and other statements that are not historical facts. Forward-looking statements are often identified by terms such as “will”, “may”, “should”, “anticipate”, “expects” and similar expressions. All statements other than statements of historical fact, included in this release, including, without limitation, statements regarding the Transaction and the future plans and objectives of the Company, are forward looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. There can be no assurance that such statements will prove to be accurate and actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the Company’s expectations are risks detailed from time to time in the filings made by the Company with securities regulations.

The reader is cautioned that assumptions used in the preparation of any forward-looking information may prove to be incorrect. Events or circumstances may cause actual results to differ materially from those predicted, as a result of numerous known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors, many of which are beyond the control of the Company. As a result, the Company cannot guarantee that the Transaction will be completed and that any forward-looking statement will materialize and the reader is cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking information. Such information, although considered reasonable by management at the time of preparation, may prove to be incorrect and actual results may differ materially from those anticipated. Forward-looking statements contained in this news release are expressly qualified by this cautionary statement. The forward-looking statements contained in this news release are made as of the date of this news release and the Company will update or revise publicly any of the included forward-looking statements as expressly required by Canadian securities law.

SOURCE: Greenstar Biosciences Corp.

View source version on accesswire.com:
https://www.accesswire.com/548517/Greenstar-Announces-Execution-of-Long-Term-Cannabis-Flower-Supply-Agreement

Published at Wed, 12 Jun 2019 12:03:22 +0000

Cannabis and The Opioid Crisis: Get the Real Facts

Cannabis and The Opioid Crisis: Get the Real Facts

  • New study sends wrong message to cannabis investors about major industry opportunity
  • How cannabis could make big impact on $29.4 billion U.S. opioids market
  • As a substitute for opioids, cannabis offers real hope to estimated 1.7 million opioid addicts and abusers 

The Opioid Crisis is a growing social tragedy. It is the product of Big Pharma greed, specifically one obsessively greedy niche of Big Pharma, but that story has already been told.

In both the United States and Canada, real hope has emerged that the legalization of “medical marijuana” (cannabis) can have a dramatic impact on reducing the scope of this Crisis. The hope is backed by science.

Patients using medical marijuana to control chronic pain reported a 64 percent reduction in their use of more traditional prescription pain medications known as opioids, a University of Michigan study finds. [emphasis mine]

Then there is an article published earlier this week in the mainstream media.

Legalizing medical cannabis reduces opioid overdose deaths? Not so fast, new study says

The [previous] 2014 study found that between 1999 and 2010, states with medical cannabis laws had a nearly 25% lower average rate of opioid overdose deaths than states without such laws…But when they expanded the time frame through 2017…States with medical marijuana laws had average rates of opioid overdose deaths that were nearly 23% higher than those without these laws.

This isn’t real science. Not even close. It’s more mainstream media Fake News on cannabis, like we have been used to seeing during a century of cannabis Prohibition. Sometimes, the more things change the more they stay the same.

Why isn’t this science? There are two ways to answer that. One way starts by looking at the real science on cannabis.

Cannabis (including the marijuana sub-species) is non-toxic and non-addictive. It is completely safe. Cannabinoids, the active ingredients in the cannabis plant, are produced naturally in the human body. Known as “endocannabinoids”, they play an important role in regulating and maintaining human health.

Cannabis is so safe that it is not “contra-indicated” with respect to any known pharmaceutical. This means it is safe to use in conjunction with other drugs – including opiates.

Now let’s apply logic to the science. In any jurisdiction that legalizes medical cannabis, this can only impact opioid users in three possible ways.

a) They can refrain from cannabis use entirely
b) They can consume cannabis along with opioids
c) They can consume cannabis instead of some/all of their opioid use

Those are the only possibilities. With (a) there can be no possible impact at all. If (b) opioid abusers consume cannabis with opioids, while this is obviously not optimal it won’t kill anyone – as noted above.

If, however, opioid abusers reduce their use of opioids in favor of medical cannabis, it must reduce the number of opioid-related deaths.

Given that medical cannabis can only help in addressing the Opioid Crisis, how do we reconcile the real science with the sensationalistic pseudo-science published by the mainstream media? This requires a little more sophistication.

According to Chelsea Shover, the author of this pseudo-science, “the evidence is telling is now” that legalizing medical marijuana does not help to reduce opioid deaths.

Evidence? Ms. Shover uses that word very loosely. The only data she cites to support her irrational conclusion is a simple correlation. In recent years, states with legalized marijuana reported more opioid deaths, not less – countering the state data that had previously been reported (in 2014) showing a reduction in opioid deaths.

It sounds impressive. Correlations are like that. Connecting two pieces of data together, but with zero evidence of causation (i.e. zero proof). Let’s put this into perspective.

Here is an example of another “correlation” to which all economics students are exposed in their studies. There is a strong correlation between economic booms and sunspot activity.

The joke among economists (who aren’t a particularly witty bunch) is that we are still trying to determine whether economic booms cause sunspots, or whether sunspots cause economic booms.

In short, simple correlations tell us nothing because they prove nothing. Does Ms. Shover offer any real scientific evidence to support her illogical conclusion? No.

What we have then is an anomaly: data that is strongly counterintuitive to both the science and the logic here. Typically, when legitimate scientists encounter such anomalous data, they seek to dig deeper to explain the anomaly.

Chelsea Shover does the opposite. Rather than making any attempt to explain the anomalous data, she simply asserts (without any other proof) that we should accept this anomaly as the new “rule” here – and simply ignore the real science.

This is typical of the anti-cannabis pseudo-science that we have seen concerning cannabis in years past. Someone who already has a negative bias towards cannabis attempts to “prove” that cannabis is in some way bad for us – with simplistic drivel that cannot withstand serious analytical scrutiny.

Let’s do what Ms. Shover didn’t do: look for ways to explain this anomalous data.

The Capitalist Explanation

The Opioid Crisis is directly derived from Big Pharma greed. So looking to greed to explain the anomalous data reported on cannabis and opioids is a good place to start.

When medical marijuana is legalized in a U.S. state, it becomes an immediate threat to the Opioid Pushers. Cannabis is relatively inexpensive. It is infinitely safer than opioids. And it is a substitute for opioid use as either a medicine or recreational drug.

What does any good capitalist do when threatened by the loss of market share as a competing product is introduced? Slash prices. Undercut the competition and reclaim the market share.

What happens if the Opioid Pushers cut prices? Opioid addicts get more opioids per dollar. More opioids per dollar = more dead addicts. Anomaly explained.

That didn’t take long. Can we come up with other plausible ways to explain the irrational anomaly. Yes.

Related to “the capitalist explanation” is a parallel means by which the Opioid Pushers can consolidate market share in the face of competition from medical cannabis. They can leave prices unchanged but increase the potency of the opiates and opioid-laced drugs that they are pushing.

Increasing the potency of these killer-drugs gets addicts higher. It increases the addictive choke-hold of the opioids because of that increased potency – making it harder to move away from opioids to cannabis.

It also means more opioids per dollar. It would also lead to more dead addicts.

In five minutes (and with little difficulty) we can produce two plausible explanations that completely refute the anti-cannabis pseudo-science produced by the mainstream media. Others can undoubtedly produce other plausible explanations. All we have left is some anomalous (and alarming) data.

Can we learn anything from this? Yes.

Such data indicates that all levels of governments need to work even harder on law enforcement aimed at the Pushers. It also means that state and local health agencies need to be even more aggressive in seeking to substitute medical cannabis for opioids.

Medical cannabis can only help in alleviating the Opioid Crisis. When we see data emerging of increasing opioid deaths, this means we need more medical cannabis not less.

That is the real message here for investors.

Published at Wed, 12 Jun 2019 23:01:23 +0000

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Jennifer Chapin, the cofounder of Kikoko, recently recalled how she was “laughed out of the dispensaries” when she tried to sell her low-dose cannabis-infused teas in her company’s early days. Three years later, Kikoko’s teas, which come in sachets and canisters wrapped with pink-and-purple stripes and cartoon flowers promising benefits such as “Sensuali-tea” and “Tranquili-tea,” are sold through over 300 storefronts and delivery services across California.

“We are a women-centric, women-owned, women-operated company,” Chapin declared to a room full of women at Arcview, a conference for cannabis investors, in Los Angeles in February. “By women, for women.”

Arcview welcomes investors irrespective of gender, but Kikoko had sponsored a women-only “tea party” (with unmedicated tea) to facilitate some female-friendly networking and announce that the company was seeking capital for expansion into new product categories, with minimum investments starting at $1 million.

Courtesy, Kikoko

Founders of female-focused cannabis startups like Kikoko may soon be laughing all the way to the bank—and they’re getting there by looking beyond millennials, and catering to women in their 40s, 50s, and beyond. Executives such as Chapin, who is 55, are listening to older women’s wishes for low-dose cannabis products that address concerns such as sleep, anxiety, and sexual pleasure, and positioning their companies at the very lucrative intersection of women, weed, and wellness.

Wellness, women, and weed

It’s a market that’s growing. Women control the majority of household purchases, and according to the US Consumer Expenditure Survey, single women over 45 spend about $640 per year on personal care items and $400 annually on drugs. As legalization takes hold, those products are increasingly likely to contain—or even be replaced by—cannabis. According to sales data and a survey of 4,000 cannabis consumers by the San Francisco-based delivery platform Eaze, the number of female cannabis consumers nearly doubled in 2018, and with their growth outpacing men, women are on track to be half of the cannabis market by 2022. Female baby boomers on the platform grew by nearly a quarter between 2017 and 2018.

Kimberly Kovacs, the cofounder and CEO of MyJane, which delivers “curated cannabis” boxes  to women (think Birchbox-meets-Eaze), was also at Arcview. That same week, her company was acquired by the cannabis logistics conglomerate MJIC for an undisclosed sum, after completing just three weeks of deliveries. MJIC CEO Sturges Karban was unabashed about the acquisition’s main attraction.

“Women are the new targets of the adult-use cannabis wellness sector,” wrote Karban, in a press release. “Yet their needs are not being addressed by the cannabis industry.”

“We don’t call that micro-dosing. We just call that normal.”

Getting stoned is not chief among those needs, Kovacs found when MyJane conducted a survey of women in Orange County, CA. When I asked what was, she didn’t skip a beat: “Sleep,” she said. “100%.”

“I don’t want to take an Ambien,” said Kovacs, who is 52, with blonde hair and clear blue eyes. “I don’t even want to take Melatonin … half a cup of tea, I sleep through the night.” (MyJane includes Kikoko tea amongst its offerings in its boxes.)

Courtesy, MyJane

In addition to better sleep, women told MyJane they were seeking relief from pain, anxiety, and stress. Many hadn’t used cannabis before and said they wanted their THC—the chemical compound that results in feeling high—in very low doses.

“By the way, we don’t call that micro-dosing,” said Kovacs. “We just call that normal.”

Ding-dong, Avon calling

Both Chapin and Kovacs referenced Avon—the 135-year-old cosmetics company known for its door-to-door saleswomen. “I don’t want to go to a dispensary,” said Kovacs. “I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

“I don’t want to go to a dispensary. I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

Instead, these companies strive to deliver both products and education in personal and familiar settings, outside dispensaries. Part of what they’re doing is teaching their customers how to use the range of new products available in the sector.

MyJane’s customers create online profiles answering questions about their symptoms, food allergies, preferences, and prior experience with cannabis. Then, a female “ambassador” from the company arrives at a customer’s doorstep on the agreed-upon date and time to deliver a box of selected products and walk the recipient through each one.

Kikoko’s teas are sold via dispensaries and delivery services, but the company also holds tea parties which include a “cannabis 101” slideshow about the plant’s history and benefits. Chapin estimates that in 2018, the company held over 100 of these events in private homes, country clubs, and retirement communities throughout California. (It was at a Kikiko tea party in Santa Monica that Chapin and Kovacs first met.)

Courtesy, Kikoko

Anyone for a cuppa?

Kikoko’s website has a page for people who want to host their own “High Tea Parties,” complete with downloadable images for invitations, tips (take public transit), and a Pinterest page of suggested menu items.

“We envision an army of women throughout the state of California,” said Chapin, of the consumers she hopes to recruit into hosting high teas.

Bridgett Davis, the founder of the Los Angeles-based cannabis topicals brand Big Momma’s Legacy, is also building a business based on older women customers—using a similar model of cohosting tea parties with local cannabis brands at private homes to slowly build her business from the ground up.

“It’s a group of maybe 10 to 15 of my golden girls,” she said of a typical event. “I have a variety of clients, from white ladies in Brentwood to old grandmas in Compton.”

Quartz/Jenni Avins

Bridgett Davis, the founder of Big Momma’s Legacy.

Davis agreed that a familiar setting and privacy were crucial to her customers, who use her salve and roll-on oil to ease the pain of rheumatism and sciatica, and said she’s counting on her “golden girls” to help her grow her business.

“I cannot ask for better brand ambassadors, and they’re not paid,” she said. “It’s grass-roots, and I’m building it bit by bit. When one of my seniors talks to their friend, their friend is listening.”

Riding the wellness wave

With the global wellness industry now worth an estimated $4 trillion worldwide, it’s little wonder that cannabis companies such as MyJane, Kikoko, and countless others position themselves as purveyors of supplies for self-care rather than recreation. And women—especially those in middle-age—are frequently caring not only for themselves, but also for their friends, children, and aging parents. (Kovacs told me she supplies her father with topicals for his arthritis, and her mother with tea for sleeping.) No wonder they’re tired.

Getty/manonallard

Don’t bogart that joint, girlfriend.

Both Kovacs and Chapin came to cannabis by way of a woman close to them suffering as a result of cancer. In Kovacs’ case, it was her mother-in-law, who eased her post-surgery pain and reduced her opioid use with cannabis. In Chapin’s, it was a dear friend who used edibles to aid her sleep and appetite, but was getting pummeled by high dosages. Both women saw the opportunity for products that spoke to women’s wellness.

Plus, noted MyJane cofounder Cara Raffele, “There’s a trust gap in healthcare for women.” Indeed, as Quartz’s Annaliese Griffin has written, that trust gap has made women particularly receptive to wellness brands that address their health concerns, respect their pain, and speak to them personally.

During her presentation at Arcview, Chapin said at one point, “we’re really tired of taking Ambien.” A women near me whispered under her breath: “That’s so me.”

Published at Mon, 20 May 2019 21:58:56 +0000

Zynerba Pharmaceuticals Is Back In Action

Zynerba Pharmaceuticals Is Back In Action

Pennsylvania based Zynerba Pharmaceuticals (ZYNE) had a major boost on Tuesday after its synthetic CBD product meant for the treatment of autism spectrum disorders received a patent.

Patent News

There is no doubt that it is a significant development for the company as the stock surged by as much as 16.50% to close at $13.50 on Tuesday. For a biotechnology company like Zynerba, a patent of this sort is quite important, since at the end of the day CBD oils are easily available to consumers. Now that they have the patent, it will be easier for the company to ensure that none of its competitors are able to come up with a similar product.

Zynerba has been on a good run for quite some time and there have been talks of positive developments in the company. In addition to its latest patent, the firm also received a United States patent for synthetic CBD product that is used for the treatment of Fragile X Syndrome. The two patents definitely give Zynerba the company the intellectual property rights clout that all businesses crave for and hence, the movement in the stock did not come as a big surprise to many.

Analysts Views

Back in April, the company’s stock had been upgraded by Roth Capital on the back of the prospects of its lead candidate Zygel, which is a CBD gel. Following the upgrade from Roth Capital, Zygel was awarded fast track status by the United States Food and Drug Administration.

Going forward, the company’s biggest task will be to conduct clinical tests of Zygel and eventually bring in to the market. Zynerba has already started enrolling patients for the second phase of the clinical study and it is believed that the data from the tests will be published in 2020. Moreover, the FDA is looking to limit the number of companies engaged in biotech CBD product and if that happens, then it could only prove to be beneficial for Zynerba, since it will shrink the competition considerably.

ZYNE’s stock is one of the biggest cannabis stock gainers with a jump of 260% so far in 2019. The stock made a new 52-week high of $16.47 in mid-May.

Published at Wed, 12 Jun 2019 20:07:59 +0000

Impact of Cannabis and Tobacco On Young Adults

Impact of Cannabis and Tobacco On Young Adults

A recent study suggests that as cannabis is being legalized in more and more countries, research has shown it can be harmful when cannabis and tobacco or other nicotine products are used together. This results in poor functioning and other health complications and many other severe cases. It is highly advisable not to use cannabis and any other tobacco or nicotine products together if you want good health and a cleaner cannabis experience.

The people consuming both tobacco and weed products results in poor functioning than those consuming separately. This has become a very important concern among people. Mixing cannabis and tobacco is more common in some other countries compared to the U.S. But in recent years, cannabis and tobacco or nicotine co-usage in the U.S. has risen among adults.

Greater Risk for Young Adults

Young adults who used both products in the past year, but did not use them on the same occasion, did not show greater risk compared to those who used only one of these products.

This results in a decrease in mental health and impacts society. It has raised a very big concern among adults. It is also observed that students of the age group 18-25 consume more of this than other age groups.

“How these products are used together matters in terms of potential consequences and functioning among people in their late teens and early 20s. Our findings suggest that we can no longer just think about the consequences of tobacco use or marijuana use alone — we have to think about them together,” said Tucker.

It is also seen that people consuming cannabis and tobacco or other nicotine products are rated to have a more functional disorder by 17%. And those who are not consuming this together results in 14%. So, this is high time now to take some relevant steps and help the future of the country by taking some important decisions related to cannabis and tobacco products.

Published at Tue, 11 Jun 2019 19:41:53 +0000

Leafbuyer Technologies Inc. (OTCMKTS:LBUY) Plans To Acquire Trade Show CBD.io

Leafbuyer Technologies Inc. (OTCMKTS:LBUY) Plans To Acquire Trade Show CBD.io

Leafbuyer
Technologies Inc. (OTCMKTS:LBUY)
has announced the signing of a non-binding letter of intent for the
acquisition of majority interest in CBD.io a trade show operation based in Las
Vegas. CBD.io runs one of the biggest and most evident expos in the Vape and
CBD industries.

Leafbuyer
to leverage CBD.io’s financial model for profitability

The agreement also includes an ownership interest
in an e-commerce platform for the retail and wholesale sale of CBD. CBD is a
non-psychoactive cannabinoid that is prevalent in cannabis that research has
shown can help in relieving anxiety, pain as well as other ailments.

Leafbuyer Technologies CEO Kurt Rossner
said that CBD is growing to become a widespread phenomenon in pop culture whose
trade indicates that the industry is productive and still unsaturated. He added
that that CBD.io is a company that is profitable and has demonstrated that its
financial model can increase the company’s top line and thus help in growing
Leafbuyer’s earnings.

Rossner said that the upside of the
acquisition is the capability for Leafbuyer gaining incredible brand exposure
from one of the fastest growing segments in the cannabis industry. In 2019
CBD.io sold close to 200 booths, and in 2019 the company plans to cross-sell
the platform to more than 400 clients a figure they will expect to double.

Leafbuyer
positioned to offer clients more value

The CEO asserted that the company is well
positioned to offer its customers a true 360 solution. Leafbuyer’s product
clients can get access to millions of potential consumers through the in-person
and digital methods to whom they can create brand awareness and thus increase
profits.

CBD.io CEO Robb Hackett stated that last
year the company hosted one of the biggest and most successful CBD and hemp
industry expos in the US. He added that in 2019, the company is expanding its
reach with a focus on educational series and more speakers as well as host
almost double the booths and offer clients more value in the trade shows. Currently,
CBD is a hot product in the US and focus in now to expand trade shows to Asia
and Europe by 2020.

Published at Tue, 11 Jun 2019 12:01:41 +0000

Marijuana Stocks Run Up Strong after Tilray, Inc. (NASDAQ: TLRY) Announces extended Privateer Lock-Up

Marijuana Stocks Run Up Strong after Tilray, Inc. (NASDAQ: TLRY) Announces extended Privateer Lock-Up

Marijuana Stocks rebounded strongly on June 10, 2019 after pot stock, Tilray, Inc. (NASDAQ: TLRY) announced that it plans to extend its lock-up on 75 million shares held by Privateer Holdings.  The terms of the deal have Privateer’s shares locked up for “up to two years”, but further to this, the fund may sell that stock “in an orderly way” over that period.

Pot Stocks News Fuels Marijuana Stocks Run-Up

Shares of Tilray, Inc. (NASDAQ: TLRY) rallied for most of the day. The stock had long been beaten down for months after having once traded as high as $300 a share after it IPO’d.  Not only did Tilray see one of its highest share volume days in months, the marijuana stock it fresh June highs.

Mark Castaneda, Chief Financial Officer of Tilray, Inc. (NASDAQ: TLRY), said, “We appreciate the long-term confidence that Privateer has in the Tilray business and we look forward to having their investors as part of our stockholder base. We believe this transaction will give Tilray, Inc. (NASDAQ: TLRY) greater control and operating flexibility while allowing us to effectively manage our public float.”

Not an Isolated Incident for Marijuana Stocks

This wasn’t a standalone event either.  The broad sector for pot stock took off in proper fashion.  Both the Alternative Harvest ETF (MJ) and AdvisorShares Pure Cannabis ETF (YOLO) printed new highs for the month of June.  Other lists of marijuana stocks including the likes of Canopy Growth (CGC), Aphria (APHA), Village Farms (VFF) and Cronos Group (CRON) all posted new June highs during their trading session on Monday (June 10th).

This news came on the heels of Tilray’s last announcement that it had signed an agreement with Neptune Wellness Solutions Inc. Tilray, Inc. (NASDAQ: TLRY) will be providing Neptune a minimum volume of 125,000 kilograms of cannabis and hemp biomass to be processed. Further to this, the first shipment is anticipated to be received in September of this year.

The appeal to Tilray, Inc. (NASDAQ: TLRY) has been due, in part, to the thinner supply of shares that the company has outstanding. Of course, this lockup agreement and “orderly” selling strategy could be less detrimental to Tilray’s float in comparison to some of the other cannabis companies in the public markets.

“We believe this transaction will give Tilray, Inc. (NASDAQ: TLRY) greater control and operating flexibility while allowing us to effectively manage our public float.”

  • Tilray CFO Mark Castaneda.

What Does Future Hold for Marijuana Stock Tilray, Inc. (NASDAQ: TLRY)?

In light of today’s positive trading momentum, there are still concerns for the cannabis company’s future.  In a Bloomberg report, Tilray’s CFO said that the company will not make a profit for at least another year.  The pot producer has been throwing money around as of late to complete more deals within the space.

Mainly the focus has been on the U.S. CBD market among other opportunities.  “If the world had stopped last fall, we had good visibility to having positive EBITDA at the end of this year, call it Q4 of this year,” CFO Mark Castaneda told Bloomberg in an interview. “This industry changes so fast, and opportunities present themselves so fast.”

Published at Mon, 10 Jun 2019 21:43:54 +0000

Ontario issues call for edible, alternative marijuana products

Ontario issues call for edible, alternative marijuana products

Ontario’s cannabis wholesaler has issued a call for new product categories – including marijuana edibles, beverages, topicals and extracts – to be introduced in Canada’s largest consumer market later this year.

The Ontario Cannabis Store is inviting federally licensed producers to identify their ability to supply the new products.

And, amid product shortages in the province, the wholesaler is asking for more dried flower, pre-rolls, capsules, oils, seeds and accessories.

Suppliers are asked to respond through the provincial portal, doingbusinesswithocs.ca, until June 28.

Deloitte recently estimated the value for the upcoming edibles and alternative cannabis products market at 2.7 billion Canadian dollars ($2 billion).

Regulations permitting cannabis edibles, extracts and topicals are legislated to come into force no later than Oct. 17, 2019, although experts do not expect a large rollout until 2020.

The final regulations outlining the rules for the new market are expected to be published by June 26.

Ontario’s legal cannabis industry has struggled to gain its footing as provincial regulators bungled the rollout of physical stores and failed to secure a consistent supply of products in the first half-year of legalization.

While Ontario is stuck at fewer than 25 physical storefronts selling adult-use cannabis products, Alberta’s market has thrived comparatively, with 104 store openings since Oct. 17, 2018. Alberta has a plan to bring the number of stores in the province to 219 by the end of the year – pending supply availability.

Receipts at the Ontario Cannabis Store – the monopoly online retailer – were just CA$7.6 million in March, up slightly from CA$7.5 million in February.

Those sales do not account for the province’s first sales at brick-and-mortar stores, which opened nearly six months after Canada legalized recreational marijuana.

Published at Mon, 10 Jun 2019 22:35:41 +0000

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Jennifer Chapin, the cofounder of Kikoko, recently recalled how she was “laughed out of the dispensaries” when she tried to sell her low-dose cannabis-infused teas in her company’s early days. Three years later, Kikoko’s teas, which come in sachets and canisters wrapped with pink-and-purple stripes and cartoon flowers promising benefits such as “Sensuali-tea” and “Tranquili-tea,” are sold through over 300 storefronts and delivery services across California.

“We are a women-centric, women-owned, women-operated company,” Chapin declared to a room full of women at Arcview, a conference for cannabis investors, in Los Angeles in February. “By women, for women.”

Arcview welcomes investors irrespective of gender, but Kikoko had sponsored a women-only “tea party” (with unmedicated tea) to facilitate some female-friendly networking and announce that the company was seeking capital for expansion into new product categories, with minimum investments starting at $1 million.

Courtesy, Kikoko

Founders of female-focused cannabis startups like Kikoko may soon be laughing all the way to the bank—and they’re getting there by looking beyond millennials, and catering to women in their 40s, 50s, and beyond. Executives such as Chapin, who is 55, are listening to older women’s wishes for low-dose cannabis products that address concerns such as sleep, anxiety, and sexual pleasure, and positioning their companies at the very lucrative intersection of women, weed, and wellness.

Wellness, women, and weed

It’s a market that’s growing. Women control the majority of household purchases, and according to the US Consumer Expenditure Survey, single women over 45 spend about $640 per year on personal care items and $400 annually on drugs. As legalization takes hold, those products are increasingly likely to contain—or even be replaced by—cannabis. According to sales data and a survey of 4,000 cannabis consumers by the San Francisco-based delivery platform Eaze, the number of female cannabis consumers nearly doubled in 2018, and with their growth outpacing men, women are on track to be half of the cannabis market by 2022. Female baby boomers on the platform grew by nearly a quarter between 2017 and 2018.

Kimberly Kovacs, the cofounder and CEO of MyJane, which delivers “curated cannabis” boxes  to women (think Birchbox-meets-Eaze), was also at Arcview. That same week, her company was acquired by the cannabis logistics conglomerate MJIC for an undisclosed sum, after completing just three weeks of deliveries. MJIC CEO Sturges Karban was unabashed about the acquisition’s main attraction.

“Women are the new targets of the adult-use cannabis wellness sector,” wrote Karban, in a press release. “Yet their needs are not being addressed by the cannabis industry.”

“We don’t call that micro-dosing. We just call that normal.”

Getting stoned is not chief among those needs, Kovacs found when MyJane conducted a survey of women in Orange County, CA. When I asked what was, she didn’t skip a beat: “Sleep,” she said. “100%.”

“I don’t want to take an Ambien,” said Kovacs, who is 52, with blonde hair and clear blue eyes. “I don’t even want to take Melatonin … half a cup of tea, I sleep through the night.” (MyJane includes Kikoko tea amongst its offerings in its boxes.)

Courtesy, MyJane

In addition to better sleep, women told MyJane they were seeking relief from pain, anxiety, and stress. Many hadn’t used cannabis before and said they wanted their THC—the chemical compound that results in feeling high—in very low doses.

“By the way, we don’t call that micro-dosing,” said Kovacs. “We just call that normal.”

Ding-dong, Avon calling

Both Chapin and Kovacs referenced Avon—the 135-year-old cosmetics company known for its door-to-door saleswomen. “I don’t want to go to a dispensary,” said Kovacs. “I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

“I don’t want to go to a dispensary. I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

Instead, these companies strive to deliver both products and education in personal and familiar settings, outside dispensaries. Part of what they’re doing is teaching their customers how to use the range of new products available in the sector.

MyJane’s customers create online profiles answering questions about their symptoms, food allergies, preferences, and prior experience with cannabis. Then, a female “ambassador” from the company arrives at a customer’s doorstep on the agreed-upon date and time to deliver a box of selected products and walk the recipient through each one.

Kikoko’s teas are sold via dispensaries and delivery services, but the company also holds tea parties which include a “cannabis 101” slideshow about the plant’s history and benefits. Chapin estimates that in 2018, the company held over 100 of these events in private homes, country clubs, and retirement communities throughout California. (It was at a Kikiko tea party in Santa Monica that Chapin and Kovacs first met.)

Courtesy, Kikoko

Anyone for a cuppa?

Kikoko’s website has a page for people who want to host their own “High Tea Parties,” complete with downloadable images for invitations, tips (take public transit), and a Pinterest page of suggested menu items.

“We envision an army of women throughout the state of California,” said Chapin, of the consumers she hopes to recruit into hosting high teas.

Bridgett Davis, the founder of the Los Angeles-based cannabis topicals brand Big Momma’s Legacy, is also building a business based on older women customers—using a similar model of cohosting tea parties with local cannabis brands at private homes to slowly build her business from the ground up.

“It’s a group of maybe 10 to 15 of my golden girls,” she said of a typical event. “I have a variety of clients, from white ladies in Brentwood to old grandmas in Compton.”

Quartz/Jenni Avins

Bridgett Davis, the founder of Big Momma’s Legacy.

Davis agreed that a familiar setting and privacy were crucial to her customers, who use her salve and roll-on oil to ease the pain of rheumatism and sciatica, and said she’s counting on her “golden girls” to help her grow her business.

“I cannot ask for better brand ambassadors, and they’re not paid,” she said. “It’s grass-roots, and I’m building it bit by bit. When one of my seniors talks to their friend, their friend is listening.”

Riding the wellness wave

With the global wellness industry now worth an estimated $4 trillion worldwide, it’s little wonder that cannabis companies such as MyJane, Kikoko, and countless others position themselves as purveyors of supplies for self-care rather than recreation. And women—especially those in middle-age—are frequently caring not only for themselves, but also for their friends, children, and aging parents. (Kovacs told me she supplies her father with topicals for his arthritis, and her mother with tea for sleeping.) No wonder they’re tired.

Getty/manonallard

Don’t bogart that joint, girlfriend.

Both Kovacs and Chapin came to cannabis by way of a woman close to them suffering as a result of cancer. In Kovacs’ case, it was her mother-in-law, who eased her post-surgery pain and reduced her opioid use with cannabis. In Chapin’s, it was a dear friend who used edibles to aid her sleep and appetite, but was getting pummeled by high dosages. Both women saw the opportunity for products that spoke to women’s wellness.

Plus, noted MyJane cofounder Cara Raffele, “There’s a trust gap in healthcare for women.” Indeed, as Quartz’s Annaliese Griffin has written, that trust gap has made women particularly receptive to wellness brands that address their health concerns, respect their pain, and speak to them personally.

During her presentation at Arcview, Chapin said at one point, “we’re really tired of taking Ambien.” A women near me whispered under her breath: “That’s so me.”

Published at Mon, 20 May 2019 21:58:56 +0000






Medical Marijuana Delivery





Your subscription could not be saved. Please try again.




Your subscription has been successful.

Subscribe now

Subscribe to our newsletter and stay updated.