Similar apps have popped up in other cities such as Los Angeles, and in some cases theyve been driven out of town. Almost 100 orders have been processed since the app launched just two weeks ago, but according to the city, delivering pot to your door is not allowed. Sacramento State graduate Stephen Found developed the Sacramento-based medical-marijuana delivery service app called Clevertree. It provides the technology, while local dispensaries provide the product and drivers. Theres all kinds of startups doing this kind of work in all kinds of industries so its really changing the way we are living our lives, he said. The city says a dispensary could lose its license if it is caught, but it also says the ordinance isnt enforced unless someone complains. So far, it hasnt received any complaints. Canna Care dispensary owner Lanette Davies has patients who are too sick to come in, or others who want to avoid being seen at the dispensary, but shes not ready to send any of her employees to someones home. We have to keep the public safe, keep the employees safe and we have to know where our product is at all times, she said. However, Foung says apps like his, no matter what industry they cater to, are the new way to do business. Technology changes our world so fast that some laws, even 5, 10 years ago, are pretty much outdated now, he said.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2015/02/09/sacramento-medical-marijuana-delivery-app-may-conflict-with-city-law/

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