Monthly Archives: June 2019

Maine recreational cannabis sales expected next spring

Maine recreational cannabis sales expected next spring

Maine is expected to launch recreational marijuana sales in March now that Gov. Janet Mills has signed a bill containing regulations recently approved by the state’s lawmakers.

The law, signed by Mills on Thursday, goes into effect 90 days after the Legislature’s session ended June 20, the Portland Press Herald reported.

Under the law, cities and towns that plan to allow recreational businesses must opt into the market, according to the newspaper. Only about 15 of Maine’s 455 municipalities have opted in thus far.

Maine voters approved recreational marijuana in 2016, but the industry’s rollout was hampered by anti-cannabis former governor Paul LePage.

Marijuana Business Daily previously reported that Maine was expected to begin recreational marijuana sales in the spring of 2020.

Published at Fri, 28 Jun 2019 19:23:14 +0000

Green Organic Dutchman Holdings Ltd (OTCMKTS:TGODF) Kicks Its Global Expansion Plan Into High Gear Through Its New Global Strategic Hemp Division

Green Organic Dutchman Holdings Ltd (OTCMKTS:TGODF) Kicks Its Global Expansion Plan Into High Gear Through Its New Global Strategic Hemp Division

Green Organic Dutchman
Holdings Ltd (OTCMKTS:TGODF)
recently unveiled its Global Strategic Hemp
Division through which it plans to expand its presence into the global organic
CBD and hemp market.

The newly launched Global Strategic Hemp Division will take
advantage of The Green Organic Dutchman’s knowledge of the hemp CBD market in
Europe. This will allow the company to fast-track its growth and also speed up
the production and commercialization of new offerings throughout its network
with the help of its international partners.

“With the global CBD market expected to hit $22 billion in less than 3 years, it is clear that the segment is drawing substantial consumer demand,” stated TGOD CEO, Brian Athaide.

TGOD already has the technical know-how that it needs to
expand in

The CEO also noted in his statement that the company’s team
has years of experience in the CBD sector and that they are excited about using
that experience in the expansion strategy. Athaide also added that CBD is the
ideal product for the company because it aligns with TGOD’s focus on organic
products. The

CEO also believes that now is the ideal time to focus on a
global expansion strategy because CBD is increasingly gaining more popularity
across that world. TGOD has also been building up its business in preparation
for more market share. For example, it acquired HemPoland last year, which
allowed it to gain access to more intellectual property.

The acquisition seems to have paid off because HemPoland’s Q1 2019 revenue
grew by roughly 30% due to the rising demand for top-grade CBD products in the
European region. Meanwhile, the new Global Strategic Hemp Division is a great
addition, especially to TGOD’s international partners. Some of those partners
offer training for standard operating procedures, organic methods and they even
provide genetics and regulatory insights.

TGOD has already secured a distribution agreement through
its partnership with a German pharmaceutical called Mediakos through HemPoland.
TGOD also plans to leverage its existing partnerships as part of its plan to
venture into the U.S CBD market. Meanwhile, the company already has a Canadian
subsidiary whose operations in the country are licensed by Health Canada.

Published at Wed, 26 Jun 2019 12:15:08 +0000

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Jennifer Chapin, the cofounder of Kikoko, recently recalled how she was “laughed out of the dispensaries” when she tried to sell her low-dose cannabis-infused teas in her company’s early days. Three years later, Kikoko’s teas, which come in sachets and canisters wrapped with pink-and-purple stripes and cartoon flowers promising benefits such as “Sensuali-tea” and “Tranquili-tea,” are sold through over 300 storefronts and delivery services across California.

“We are a women-centric, women-owned, women-operated company,” Chapin declared to a room full of women at Arcview, a conference for cannabis investors, in Los Angeles in February. “By women, for women.”

Arcview welcomes investors irrespective of gender, but Kikoko had sponsored a women-only “tea party” (with unmedicated tea) to facilitate some female-friendly networking and announce that the company was seeking capital for expansion into new product categories, with minimum investments starting at $1 million.

Courtesy, Kikoko

Founders of female-focused cannabis startups like Kikoko may soon be laughing all the way to the bank—and they’re getting there by looking beyond millennials, and catering to women in their 40s, 50s, and beyond. Executives such as Chapin, who is 55, are listening to older women’s wishes for low-dose cannabis products that address concerns such as sleep, anxiety, and sexual pleasure, and positioning their companies at the very lucrative intersection of women, weed, and wellness.

Wellness, women, and weed

It’s a market that’s growing. Women control the majority of household purchases, and according to the US Consumer Expenditure Survey, single women over 45 spend about $640 per year on personal care items and $400 annually on drugs. As legalization takes hold, those products are increasingly likely to contain—or even be replaced by—cannabis. According to sales data and a survey of 4,000 cannabis consumers by the San Francisco-based delivery platform Eaze, the number of female cannabis consumers nearly doubled in 2018, and with their growth outpacing men, women are on track to be half of the cannabis market by 2022. Female baby boomers on the platform grew by nearly a quarter between 2017 and 2018.

Kimberly Kovacs, the cofounder and CEO of MyJane, which delivers “curated cannabis” boxes  to women (think Birchbox-meets-Eaze), was also at Arcview. That same week, her company was acquired by the cannabis logistics conglomerate MJIC for an undisclosed sum, after completing just three weeks of deliveries. MJIC CEO Sturges Karban was unabashed about the acquisition’s main attraction.

“Women are the new targets of the adult-use cannabis wellness sector,” wrote Karban, in a press release. “Yet their needs are not being addressed by the cannabis industry.”

“We don’t call that micro-dosing. We just call that normal.”

Getting stoned is not chief among those needs, Kovacs found when MyJane conducted a survey of women in Orange County, CA. When I asked what was, she didn’t skip a beat: “Sleep,” she said. “100%.”

“I don’t want to take an Ambien,” said Kovacs, who is 52, with blonde hair and clear blue eyes. “I don’t even want to take Melatonin … half a cup of tea, I sleep through the night.” (MyJane includes Kikoko tea amongst its offerings in its boxes.)

Courtesy, MyJane

In addition to better sleep, women told MyJane they were seeking relief from pain, anxiety, and stress. Many hadn’t used cannabis before and said they wanted their THC—the chemical compound that results in feeling high—in very low doses.

“By the way, we don’t call that micro-dosing,” said Kovacs. “We just call that normal.”

Ding-dong, Avon calling

Both Chapin and Kovacs referenced Avon—the 135-year-old cosmetics company known for its door-to-door saleswomen. “I don’t want to go to a dispensary,” said Kovacs. “I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

“I don’t want to go to a dispensary. I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

Instead, these companies strive to deliver both products and education in personal and familiar settings, outside dispensaries. Part of what they’re doing is teaching their customers how to use the range of new products available in the sector.

MyJane’s customers create online profiles answering questions about their symptoms, food allergies, preferences, and prior experience with cannabis. Then, a female “ambassador” from the company arrives at a customer’s doorstep on the agreed-upon date and time to deliver a box of selected products and walk the recipient through each one.

Kikoko’s teas are sold via dispensaries and delivery services, but the company also holds tea parties which include a “cannabis 101” slideshow about the plant’s history and benefits. Chapin estimates that in 2018, the company held over 100 of these events in private homes, country clubs, and retirement communities throughout California. (It was at a Kikiko tea party in Santa Monica that Chapin and Kovacs first met.)

Courtesy, Kikoko

Anyone for a cuppa?

Kikoko’s website has a page for people who want to host their own “High Tea Parties,” complete with downloadable images for invitations, tips (take public transit), and a Pinterest page of suggested menu items.

“We envision an army of women throughout the state of California,” said Chapin, of the consumers she hopes to recruit into hosting high teas.

Bridgett Davis, the founder of the Los Angeles-based cannabis topicals brand Big Momma’s Legacy, is also building a business based on older women customers—using a similar model of cohosting tea parties with local cannabis brands at private homes to slowly build her business from the ground up.

“It’s a group of maybe 10 to 15 of my golden girls,” she said of a typical event. “I have a variety of clients, from white ladies in Brentwood to old grandmas in Compton.”

Quartz/Jenni Avins

Bridgett Davis, the founder of Big Momma’s Legacy.

Davis agreed that a familiar setting and privacy were crucial to her customers, who use her salve and roll-on oil to ease the pain of rheumatism and sciatica, and said she’s counting on her “golden girls” to help her grow her business.

“I cannot ask for better brand ambassadors, and they’re not paid,” she said. “It’s grass-roots, and I’m building it bit by bit. When one of my seniors talks to their friend, their friend is listening.”

Riding the wellness wave

With the global wellness industry now worth an estimated $4 trillion worldwide, it’s little wonder that cannabis companies such as MyJane, Kikoko, and countless others position themselves as purveyors of supplies for self-care rather than recreation. And women—especially those in middle-age—are frequently caring not only for themselves, but also for their friends, children, and aging parents. (Kovacs told me she supplies her father with topicals for his arthritis, and her mother with tea for sleeping.) No wonder they’re tired.

Getty/manonallard

Don’t bogart that joint, girlfriend.

Both Kovacs and Chapin came to cannabis by way of a woman close to them suffering as a result of cancer. In Kovacs’ case, it was her mother-in-law, who eased her post-surgery pain and reduced her opioid use with cannabis. In Chapin’s, it was a dear friend who used edibles to aid her sleep and appetite, but was getting pummeled by high dosages. Both women saw the opportunity for products that spoke to women’s wellness.

Plus, noted MyJane cofounder Cara Raffele, “There’s a trust gap in healthcare for women.” Indeed, as Quartz’s Annaliese Griffin has written, that trust gap has made women particularly receptive to wellness brands that address their health concerns, respect their pain, and speak to them personally.

During her presentation at Arcview, Chapin said at one point, “we’re really tired of taking Ambien.” A women near me whispered under her breath: “That’s so me.”

Published at Mon, 20 May 2019 21:58:56 +0000

US Supreme Court declines to hear 280E marijuana tax case

US Supreme Court declines to hear 280E marijuana tax case

Marijuana businesses hoping to see the end of onerous 280E tax provisions were dealt a setback by the nation’s highest court.

The U.S. Supreme Court declined to review a petition brought by a Colorado medical cannabis dispensary challenging the authority of the Internal Revenue Service.

Alpenglow Botanicals, based in Breckenridge, argued in its petition to the high court that Section 280E of the federal tax code doesn’t empower the IRS to investigate and rule that a marijuana business has violated federal criminal drug laws.

The federal government responded that 280E specifies that no tax deduction or credit should be allowed for any expense paid or incurred in carrying out a business that “consists of trafficking in controlled substances.”

Marijuana is listed as a Schedule 1 drug under the Controlled Substances Act.

Both the U.S. District Court in Colorado and the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver had affirmed the IRS ruling.

Alpenglow had claimed a variety of business deductions that the IRS determined were prohibited by 280E.

The denial of the deductions resulted in Alpenglow owners Charles and Justin Williams owing a total of $53,094 to the IRS, according to court documents.

After the bill was paid, Alpenglow filed refund claims and started on the road of challenging in court the application of 280E.

Alpenglow’s attorney didn’t immediately respond to Marijuana Business Daily‘s request for comment.

Jeff Smith can be reached at [email protected]

Published at Fri, 28 Jun 2019 20:38:06 +0000

Bipartisan lawmakers offer congressional bill to promote cannabis, CBD research

Bipartisan lawmakers offer congressional bill to promote cannabis, CBD research

A bipartisan group of U.S. senators introduced a federal bill to bolster marijuana and CBD research, a move that could encourage more doctors to recommend medical cannabis and expand legalization efforts.

The bill also would amend the definition of marijuana in the federal Controlled Substances Act to exclude the synthetic equivalent of hemp-derived CBD that contains less than 0.3% THC.

Sens. Dianne Feinstein, a California Democrat, Chuck Grassley, an Iowa Republican, and Brian Schatz, a Hawaii Democrat, introduced the Cannabidiol and Marijuana Research Expansion Act.

“Our combined bill streamlines the research process and paves the way for marijuana-derived medications that are FDA-approved to keep consumers safe,” Feinstein said in a news release, referring to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Grassley and Schatz added that research is necessary to determine the potential medical and health benefits of the substances.

The bill is co-sponsored by a bipartisan group of six U.S. senators. It also has the backing of the American Medical Association.

Some of the bill’s key provisions would:

  • Expedite and simplify the process for reviewing and approving marijuana research applications.
  • Streamline the development of FDA-approved substances using CBD and marijuana.
  • Allow doctors to discuss with adult patients the potential harms and benefits of marijuana and derivatives such as CBD.
  • Require the Department of Health and Human Services to report to Congress on the potential effects of marijuana on the body, adolescent brain and cognitive abilities.

Published at Fri, 28 Jun 2019 21:12:39 +0000

Another Cannabis Based Company Hits Nasdaq

Another Cannabis Based Company Hits Nasdaq

The cannabis industry has become quite relevant in the consumer market and as an investment option. Increasing market returns from pot stocks over the past years are proof of this. Various estimates project cannabis sales to go from $50 billion to $75 billion over the next decade. This implies that investors could see heavy profits.

High Volatility In The Cannabis Stock

Various players and corporations are venturing into the marijuana industry because it is getting a lot of attention. AKERNA (NASDAQ:KERN) is one example of this. Akerna was formed after a merger between the cannabis-software service company MJ Freeway and an acquisitions company, MTech Acquisitions. The merger was announced in October was finally completed last week.

Akerna became the first cannabis-based company to be listed on Nasdaq without an IPO or over-the-counter exchange option. It was open for trading on Nasdaq on Tuesday, June 18. However, the first day of trading saw only mild trades (over 120,000 shares) with stocks closing at $14.85 per share. The following two days saw an improvement with more than 3 million shares being traded each day. This led to the value of the cannabis stock to triple to $49.80 on Wednesday. It continued to grow over 50% to $73 Thursday morning. Since then, Akerna’s stock has sharply corrected, closing at $21.70 during Thursday’s session. After rising 600%, the stock has lost the majority of its gain.

Marijuana Stock’s Business Model

This business pick-up was a result of the unique business model of Akerna. Akerna’s primary business includes seed-to-sale technology which involves the development of unique software for the cannabis industry. This is quite valuable, especially since the cannabis industry needs to be sternly overseen. The software would help the state keep a track of the plants grown, ensuring no illegal dealing. As cannabis’ federal status remains illegal, states would benefit greatly from the software.

Another focus for the company would be providing consultancy services in the cannabis industry. This would help other marijuana businesses better connect with its customers by understanding their requirements and needs. Akerna would also help the companies understand the regulations more clearly, aiding them with license procedures as well. With clients in 29 of the 33 cannabis-legal states and 11 counties globally, the business does seem promising.

However, there are various flaws that an investor should be aware of. One of them is the company’s dependency on cash, which could leave the whole business invaluable. The financials of MTech have not impressed either. Its sales fell from $5.53 million to $4.97 million in the first 6 months of the 2018 fiscal year. The net loss reported also rose from $2.9 million to $4 million.

Another concern is the large sales percentage, 43% of total sales, by Washington and Pennsylvania. This shows Akerna’s reliance on these two. A contractual change with them could leave a heavy dent on the cannabis company’s revenue. On top of this, Akerna plans on performing an aggressive acquisition. This requires a major portion of shares to be diluted into common stock so they can fund the acquisition. Another common weakness seen in most cannabis-based organizations is the lack of proper internal controls over the firms’ finances.

Published at Fri, 28 Jun 2019 19:45:55 +0000

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Female Founders in Their 50s Are Starting Cannabis Companies to Take Care of Their Own

Jennifer Chapin, the cofounder of Kikoko, recently recalled how she was “laughed out of the dispensaries” when she tried to sell her low-dose cannabis-infused teas in her company’s early days. Three years later, Kikoko’s teas, which come in sachets and canisters wrapped with pink-and-purple stripes and cartoon flowers promising benefits such as “Sensuali-tea” and “Tranquili-tea,” are sold through over 300 storefronts and delivery services across California.

“We are a women-centric, women-owned, women-operated company,” Chapin declared to a room full of women at Arcview, a conference for cannabis investors, in Los Angeles in February. “By women, for women.”

Arcview welcomes investors irrespective of gender, but Kikoko had sponsored a women-only “tea party” (with unmedicated tea) to facilitate some female-friendly networking and announce that the company was seeking capital for expansion into new product categories, with minimum investments starting at $1 million.

Courtesy, Kikoko

Founders of female-focused cannabis startups like Kikoko may soon be laughing all the way to the bank—and they’re getting there by looking beyond millennials, and catering to women in their 40s, 50s, and beyond. Executives such as Chapin, who is 55, are listening to older women’s wishes for low-dose cannabis products that address concerns such as sleep, anxiety, and sexual pleasure, and positioning their companies at the very lucrative intersection of women, weed, and wellness.

Wellness, women, and weed

It’s a market that’s growing. Women control the majority of household purchases, and according to the US Consumer Expenditure Survey, single women over 45 spend about $640 per year on personal care items and $400 annually on drugs. As legalization takes hold, those products are increasingly likely to contain—or even be replaced by—cannabis. According to sales data and a survey of 4,000 cannabis consumers by the San Francisco-based delivery platform Eaze, the number of female cannabis consumers nearly doubled in 2018, and with their growth outpacing men, women are on track to be half of the cannabis market by 2022. Female baby boomers on the platform grew by nearly a quarter between 2017 and 2018.

Kimberly Kovacs, the cofounder and CEO of MyJane, which delivers “curated cannabis” boxes  to women (think Birchbox-meets-Eaze), was also at Arcview. That same week, her company was acquired by the cannabis logistics conglomerate MJIC for an undisclosed sum, after completing just three weeks of deliveries. MJIC CEO Sturges Karban was unabashed about the acquisition’s main attraction.

“Women are the new targets of the adult-use cannabis wellness sector,” wrote Karban, in a press release. “Yet their needs are not being addressed by the cannabis industry.”

“We don’t call that micro-dosing. We just call that normal.”

Getting stoned is not chief among those needs, Kovacs found when MyJane conducted a survey of women in Orange County, CA. When I asked what was, she didn’t skip a beat: “Sleep,” she said. “100%.”

“I don’t want to take an Ambien,” said Kovacs, who is 52, with blonde hair and clear blue eyes. “I don’t even want to take Melatonin … half a cup of tea, I sleep through the night.” (MyJane includes Kikoko tea amongst its offerings in its boxes.)

Courtesy, MyJane

In addition to better sleep, women told MyJane they were seeking relief from pain, anxiety, and stress. Many hadn’t used cannabis before and said they wanted their THC—the chemical compound that results in feeling high—in very low doses.

“By the way, we don’t call that micro-dosing,” said Kovacs. “We just call that normal.”

Ding-dong, Avon calling

Both Chapin and Kovacs referenced Avon—the 135-year-old cosmetics company known for its door-to-door saleswomen. “I don’t want to go to a dispensary,” said Kovacs. “I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

“I don’t want to go to a dispensary. I don’t even want to go to the grocery store anymore!”

Instead, these companies strive to deliver both products and education in personal and familiar settings, outside dispensaries. Part of what they’re doing is teaching their customers how to use the range of new products available in the sector.

MyJane’s customers create online profiles answering questions about their symptoms, food allergies, preferences, and prior experience with cannabis. Then, a female “ambassador” from the company arrives at a customer’s doorstep on the agreed-upon date and time to deliver a box of selected products and walk the recipient through each one.

Kikoko’s teas are sold via dispensaries and delivery services, but the company also holds tea parties which include a “cannabis 101” slideshow about the plant’s history and benefits. Chapin estimates that in 2018, the company held over 100 of these events in private homes, country clubs, and retirement communities throughout California. (It was at a Kikiko tea party in Santa Monica that Chapin and Kovacs first met.)

Courtesy, Kikoko

Anyone for a cuppa?

Kikoko’s website has a page for people who want to host their own “High Tea Parties,” complete with downloadable images for invitations, tips (take public transit), and a Pinterest page of suggested menu items.

“We envision an army of women throughout the state of California,” said Chapin, of the consumers she hopes to recruit into hosting high teas.

Bridgett Davis, the founder of the Los Angeles-based cannabis topicals brand Big Momma’s Legacy, is also building a business based on older women customers—using a similar model of cohosting tea parties with local cannabis brands at private homes to slowly build her business from the ground up.

“It’s a group of maybe 10 to 15 of my golden girls,” she said of a typical event. “I have a variety of clients, from white ladies in Brentwood to old grandmas in Compton.”

Quartz/Jenni Avins

Bridgett Davis, the founder of Big Momma’s Legacy.

Davis agreed that a familiar setting and privacy were crucial to her customers, who use her salve and roll-on oil to ease the pain of rheumatism and sciatica, and said she’s counting on her “golden girls” to help her grow her business.

“I cannot ask for better brand ambassadors, and they’re not paid,” she said. “It’s grass-roots, and I’m building it bit by bit. When one of my seniors talks to their friend, their friend is listening.”

Riding the wellness wave

With the global wellness industry now worth an estimated $4 trillion worldwide, it’s little wonder that cannabis companies such as MyJane, Kikoko, and countless others position themselves as purveyors of supplies for self-care rather than recreation. And women—especially those in middle-age—are frequently caring not only for themselves, but also for their friends, children, and aging parents. (Kovacs told me she supplies her father with topicals for his arthritis, and her mother with tea for sleeping.) No wonder they’re tired.

Getty/manonallard

Don’t bogart that joint, girlfriend.

Both Kovacs and Chapin came to cannabis by way of a woman close to them suffering as a result of cancer. In Kovacs’ case, it was her mother-in-law, who eased her post-surgery pain and reduced her opioid use with cannabis. In Chapin’s, it was a dear friend who used edibles to aid her sleep and appetite, but was getting pummeled by high dosages. Both women saw the opportunity for products that spoke to women’s wellness.

Plus, noted MyJane cofounder Cara Raffele, “There’s a trust gap in healthcare for women.” Indeed, as Quartz’s Annaliese Griffin has written, that trust gap has made women particularly receptive to wellness brands that address their health concerns, respect their pain, and speak to them personally.

During her presentation at Arcview, Chapin said at one point, “we’re really tired of taking Ambien.” A women near me whispered under her breath: “That’s so me.”

Published at Mon, 20 May 2019 21:58:56 +0000

Public Support For Legal Weed Continues To Soar

Public Support For Legal Weed Continues To Soar

  • Support for fully legalized cannabis at an all-time high among Americans
  • Public support is soaring the fastest among senior citizens and Independent voters
  • Opposition to legalization is falling the fastest among Republican voters
  • Cannabis support is rapidly becoming homogenous between different age groups and genders

Americans want fully legalized cannabis.

That’s not news. An October 2018 Gallup poll showed a full two-thirds of the U.S. population supports the legalization of cannabis – for medicinal and recreational use – including majorities from all political demographics.

However, new numbers released by Civic Science show how rapidly this support is growing in the U.S. This applies to not only Americans of all political stripes, but also all age groups, and both genders.


 

  • Support among independent voters has soared by 16% in just one year
  • Opposition among Republicans has plummeted by 11% in just one year
  • 4 out of 5 Democrats now support fully legal cannabis

These are numbers that U.S. politicians cannot afford to ignore. If you’re a Democrat, you must support legalized cannabis, or kiss goodbye getting elected. If you’re a Republican, except in the most conservative corners of the country, opposing legalized cannabis is now a guaranteed vote-loser. And for Independents, if you oppose legalized cannabis, good luck trying to win a seat.

The numbers are equally stunning when we look at age demographics.

Obviously, what is striking here is the jump in support for legalized cannabis among older Americans. Ironically, the past two years has done little in terms of increasing support among the younger half of the population – those most supportive of cannabis legalization.

However, among older Americans:

  • Support has jumped by 8% among the 45 – 64 grouping
  • Support has jumped by 11% among America’s seniors

This last number is especially significant. Elderly Americans are typically much more conservative in their views. Equally, these are the Americans who have spent the most years being subjected to anti-cannabis propaganda from government and media.

These older Americans are now being exposed to cannabis, very possibly for the first time in their lives. This could mean either by usage among younger friends/relatives, or very possibly medicinal use of cannabis for themselves. As cannabis reality replaces cannabis mythology for these Americans, their fear of “the Demon Weed” is rapidly evaporating.

Here, the message is for the cannabis industry.

Many cannabis companies targeting cannabis retail may have thought they needed to convey a ‘hip’ image with their packaging and marketing to appeal to the younger demographic that they thought was their primary market.

Now cannabis companies (at least those based in the U.S.) will be re-thinking this assumption. The Civic Science numbers indicate that support for fully legalized cannabis among Americans aged 45-64 (65%) now slightly exceeds support by Americans under age 25 (64%).

This connects directly with a June 14, 2019 article on Green Entrepreneur, submitted by guest writer John Gorst. As the CEO of IONIC Brands Corp (CAN: IONC /US: IONKF) and active in the cannabis space for 7 years, Gorst has learned a thing or two about cannabis.

He wrote:
 

As consumption becomes more normalized, the average consumer skews farther and farther away from preconceived stereotypes. Studies are revealing that today’s consumers have very high household incomes and are more likely to have master’s degrees. This means that some of the most successful professionals around us are a part of a “shadow market” of cannabis consumers. But why are America’s executives switching over to the plant?

That’s precisely what the numbers from Civic Science seem to be suggesting. The Seed Investor covered this article in much greater depth in a recent TSI Exclusive, In The Mood for Cannabis? You Will Be – Soon.

Cannabis is becoming “normalized”. The better that people get to know cannabis, the more that they like it. Stereotypes are evaporating – as cannabis fact replaces cannabis fiction.

Speaking of evaporating stereotypes, the idea that smoking (or vaping) cannabis is “a guy thing” is also becoming a thing of the past.

Opposition to legalized cannabis is now exactly even between genders. The only (slight) difference is that less males than females are unsure about full legalization.

As the American people develop a clearer (and more favorable) picture of cannabis, cannabis companies are getting a much clearer picture of their target market – everyone. All ages, all political affiliations, male and female alike.

 
DISCLOSURE: IONIC Brands is a paid client of The Seed Investor.
 

 

Published at Thu, 27 Jun 2019 21:44:51 +0000

SinglePoint Inc. (OTCMKTS:SING) Report Exceptional Response For LALPINA CBD Water

SinglePoint Inc. (OTCMKTS:SING) Report Exceptional Response For LALPINA CBD Water

SinglePoint Inc. (OTCMKTS:SING) e-commerce
platform SingleSeed.com has received an exceptional response in regard to the
news of American Premium Water Company’s (OTCMKTS:HIPH) LALPINA CBD water.

LALPINA CBD Water leading in sales on SingleSeed
site

The companies are
excited with the response they have so far seen for the demand of LALPINA CBD
Water. The LALPINA CBD water has been a top seller on the platform and has
witnessed multiple reorders. However, on June 20 the site experienced a lot of
traffic leading to its crashing thus causing delays in ordering before the site
could be restored later with more resources being added. The site is offering a
10% discount for convenience on LALPINA CBD Water products throughout the
weekend using the code crash at checkout.

SinglePoint
President Wil Ralston stated that the LALPINA CBD water has been a vital
product on the platform that has had a tremendous response. The response is a
promising opportunity for SIngleSeed.com and LALPINA. Ralston added that the company
is looking forward to continuing its shipping orders and great relationship to
all its customers. He further indicated that the company had solved the delays
caused by the crashing of the website and the company has taken steps to avoid
such an issue.

Relationship with SingleSeed to help in expansion of
LALPINA water line

In recent weeks
the LALPINA CBD water product has been among the top sellers on SingleSeed
resulting in the company ramping up deliveries because of the capability of
SingleSeed to deliver the products to the market. The company indicated that
they foresee the relationship with SingleSeed helping them in the expansion of
the LALPINA water line as well as other CBD products as one of the company’s
most successful e-commerce distribution partners.  

The company is
equally looking to secure other strategic partnerships that could be beneficial
for both companies.

SinglePoint Inc.
is an investment and technology company whose main focus is the acquisition of
companies that will profit from the integration of technology and injection of
growth capital. The company’s product portfolio includes blockchain solutions,
ancillary cannabis services as well as mobile payments. The company provides
cannabis products and services through SingleSeed.

Published at Thu, 27 Jun 2019 12:01:54 +0000

Agraflora Organics International Inc. (OTCMKTS:PUFXF) Provides Updates On Expansion Initiatives Of The Brunswick Bierworks Facilty

Agraflora Organics International Inc. (OTCMKTS:PUFXF) Provides Updates On Expansion Initiatives Of The Brunswick Bierworks Facilty

AgraFlora Organics International Inc. (OTCMKTS:PUFXF) has provided operational guidance as well as retrofit updates
regarding the current expansion initiatives of the Brunswick Bierworks facility
that is located in Toronto. 

Expansion initiative to increase production to 130,000
hl

The expansion
initiative involves an increase of the annual production capacity to around
130,000 hectolitres which is a 305 increase of the previous maximum capacity. The
initiative also involves access to more off-site alternative brewing capacity and
the installation of a CBD-infused drink packaging line that has four, six and
twelve can capability.

The company
expects to commence product formulation and batch testing as from Q3 2019 with
commercial production expected to begin in Q4 2019. There is planned
development of a CBD-infused tasting facility. 
AgraFlora has a partnership agreement with renowned Canadian brewing
Brunswick Bierworks and it holds exclusive formulation, production, and
distribution rights of CBD infused drinks manufactured at Brunswick’s Brewhouse
in Toronto Ontario.

The company and
Brunswick Bierworks are expected to continue pursuing aggressively the
expansion initiatives at the ultra-modern Brewhouse. Once the expansion of the
facility retrofit is completed the total capital expenditures used on the
Brewhouse will be in excess of C$20 million. The Brewhouse that is composed of
a group of experienced brewery associates has so far completed a number of
production runs for renowned European beverage brands like Augustiner, Guinness
and Inner & Gunn.

AgraFlora to leverage Brunswick Bierworks’ proprietary
processing technology

The partnership
between AgraFlora and the Brewhouse put it on the forefront of the CBD beverage
industry in Canada because of the proprietary processing technology of the
Brewhouse that makes it suitable for the development of CBD-infused and
non-alcoholic drinks.

AgraFlora CEO
Brandon Boddy stated that the company’s partnership with Brunswick Bierworks
will help in cementing the company’s position in the CBD-infused drinks sector
in Canada. The company is looking forward to the legalization of cannabis
beverages and edibles in Canada later this year and the partnership solidifies
AgraFlora’s brewing infrastructure distribution relationships and product
development that is necessary for attaining greater market share.

Published at Fri, 28 Jun 2019 12:01:19 +0000