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How a Family-Owned Company is Finding Success in Santa Barbara County, Calif.

How a Family-Owned Company is Finding Success in Santa Barbara County, Calif.

With Illinois poised to begin adult-use cannabis sales Jan. 1, 2020, some of Chicago’s aldermen and public stakeholders are concerned that a program designed to improve social equity access for minority business owners won’t live up to its promise.

A photo depicting a room full of white men participating in the city’s dispensary-license lottery on Nov. 15 went viral, eliciting responses from those who are upset that, when the program begins, there won’t be equity in ownership for black or Latino residents—or other prospective entrepreneurs based in areas of the city disproportionately affected by prohibition-era cannabis arrests.

The owners of Chicago’s 11 medical dispensaries are all white, and theirs are the only businesses that are either licensed or allowed to apply for licenses to add adult-use sales on Jan. 1. They participated in the lottery for the chance to acquire licenses for secondary locations, and other existing medical dispensaries in surrounding areas were the remaining lottery participants vying for the chance to add stores in the city.

Because there are none of Illinois’ medical cannabis business owners are black, according to the Chicago Sun-Times, and the approaching adult-use market will be based off of the state’s medical cannabis industry, the first adult-use dispensary owners in Chicago won’t be reflective of that city’s population, says Jason Ervin, 28th Ward alderman and chairman of City Council’s 20-member Black Caucus.

That’s a problem, Ervin says, as African Americans have been disproportionately impacted by arrest and incarceration due to cannabis offenses and should be able to fully participate in the industry once it is legitimized.

“We’re going to buy today, we’re in jail today, so why can’t we have equity today?” he asks.

Ervin and the Black Caucus introduced an ordinance in October that would delay the sale of adult-use cannabis in the city until July 1, 2020, to try to get more minority ownership in the space.

“I think that to have all of this activity in the state of Illinois and to walk out to no participation, for many communities of color, I just think that’s wrong,” Ervin says. “And I think we need to work to fix it.”

The reason the room in that viral photo looked the way it did is because Illinois is distancing itself from other states in its approach to cannabis legalization. It’s issuing adult-use licenses in phases—first making them available to established medical cannabis businesses who have capital and experience adhering to regulations in the space. Then the state will open the field to others, including social equity applicants, says Toi Hutchinson, senior adviser to the governor on cannabis control.

This is an attempt at achieving social equity both in the industry and in the communities that have been hurt the most by prohibition, says Hutchinson, who played a large role in drafting Illinois’ Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act as a state senator.

In drafting the bill, the state made some concessions to the existing medical market, State Sen. Kimberly Lightford told the Chicago Sun-Times earlier this year.

David Moore, Ward 17 alderman, says he doesn’t think medical dispensaries should have been given priority in the adult-use program rollout, but he understands the state had to do what was necessary to pass the bill. Looking at the lack of current equity ownership in his city, he says, “I think right now, we need to slow the train on this in Chicago.”

Illinois designed its program to be race-neutral so that it can hold up in court, Hutchinson says. But it addresses social equity in areas where people have been the most disproportionately impacted by the war on drugs, and where many black and Latino residents live. To that end, the state created a “Disproportionately Impacted Areas” map that plays a role in determining who can be a social equity applicant.

“I think it’s important to note that you can’t go back and change the past, but you can take very aggressive steps to make sure that the future looks differently.”

– Jason Erkes, chief communications officer at Cresco Labs

“What we know about that population is that it’s 55% African American and 22% Latino that have been disproportionately impacted,” Hutchinson says. “We know that. So, we designed an application, we designed a process, we designed a system that would try to get some of those folks the ability to come into this thing.”

Illinois’ “Disproportionately Impacted Areas” shows that Chicago neighborhoods hit hardest by prohibition are on the city’s south and west sides.

People who don’t already operate medical dispensaries can apply through Jan. 1 for a conditional license to sell adult-use cannabis. Forty-seven of these conditional licenses will be available to be awarded to dispensaries in the Bureau of Labor Statistics Region of Chicago-Naperville, Elgin, according to the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR).

The state will select licenses based on a point system. Within that system, “Status as a Social Equity Applicant” alone can earn an applicant 50 points out of a total of 250, or 20%.

Illinois will put initial operators’ licensing fees into a $30-million fund that will go toward a revolving loan program for social equity applicants, Hutchinson says. “The other thing is that people typically only talk about this for dispensaries and cultivation centers,” she adds. “We added multiple more on-ramps, so the craft grower licenses, the infuser licenses, the transporter licenses.”

In Chicago, dispensaries will at first be limited to seven storefronts in each of seven different zones. Between the 11 existing medical dispensaries and 31 lottery slots already issued, the city could hand out up to 42 adult-use licenses. Then, around May 1, the state will start issuing up to 47 conditional licenses to Chicago-Naperville, Elgin. Also on May 1, Chicago may double the number of dispensaries allowed in each of its seven zones.

Cresco Labs currently operates five medical dispensaries in Illinois, including one in Chicago. That Chicago dispensary, MedMar, in the Lakeview neighborhood, will add adult-use sales on Jan. 1. Also, pending approval, Cresco will add three more dispensaries that it drew for in the Nov. 15 lottery.

Jason Erkes, chief communications officer at Cresco, says the state’s bill “is the most thoughtful piece of legislation that’s ever been crafted for adult-use cannabis.”

The bill, Erkes points out, states that the existing medical dispensaries must follow a “Social Equity Inclusion Plan.” One of these several specific plans outlined by the state is that dispensaries can host an incubator program that, according to the bill, says each participating dispensary would “provide a loan of at least $100,000” and mentor a social equity applicant for at least one year.

Cresco recently launched its own program in Illinois called Social Equity & Educational Development (SEED), which, according to a press release from the company, is “the cannabis industry’s first national social equity initiative promoting inclusion, expungement, equality, access and community engagement.” The company is incubating 150 people in roughly 35 groups on how to apply with the state for a dispensary license, Erkes says, adding that Cresco provides them coaching and pro bono legal counsel.

“I think it’s important to note that you can’t go back and change the past, but you can take very aggressive steps to make sure that the future looks differently,” Erkes says. “And that’s what this legislation does, and that’s what all the companies that are currently in this industry are committed to doing.”

“Now, if someone can show me a model for how you do it and get exactly what they’re asking us to do, show it, because it doesn’t exist.”

– Toi Hutchinson, senior adviser to the governor on cannabis control

Moore calls Chicago Illinois’ “cash cow” for the adult-use cannabis industry. “People want to be in Chicago, so if we do what we need to do to hold this up, everybody will come to the table, and there’s space where they can work and do some compromise,” he says. “And they know that they can. Right now, today, they’re getting away like a fat rat in a cheese factory at this point. And we have to, again, just slow this train down until there’s more equity that’s representative of this city.”

Other states allowed everyone to come into their adult-use programs right away, Hutchinson says. This, she adds, has resulted in one dispensary for every 6,000 people in Oregon, one for every 10,000 in Colorado, one for every 37,000 in Washington and one for every 47,000 in Colorado.

In contrast, she says, Chicago will open with one dispensary for every 424,000 residents, and if it gives out 100 licenses by early 2020, it will still only have one for every 127,000 people. This is how the state can protect market share for social equity applicants, she says, adding that it’s too early to critique inequity on day one of legalization.

“Every other state opened the doors wide open—like wide open—and then tried to backdoor equity at the city or county level,” Hutchinson says. “And what we’ve seen—it does not work. So, we have to do this differently. Now, if someone can show me a model for how you do it and get exactly what they’re asking us to do, show it, because it doesn’t exist.”

In a Dec. 4 hearing held by Chicago City Council’s Committee on Contracting Oversight and Equity, Ervin continued to speak out about a lack of current equity. With cannabis industry members present, the room had mixed opinions about the Black Caucus’ proposed delay of sales. “Of course, they want to move as expeditiously as possible,” Ervin says. “But at the same time, we want to ensure that the equity is at the forefront of all of these conversations.”

Published at Fri, 13 Dec 2019 07:35:00 +0000

Season’s Greenings! These Are The Best Cannabis And CBD Gifts Of 2019

Season’s Greenings! These Are The Best Cannabis And CBD Gifts Of 2019

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‘Tis the season to be, like, really jolly. Here are some stocking stuffers for CBD and THC enthusiasts alike.

The post Season’s Greenings! These Are The Best Cannabis And CBD Gifts Of 2019 appeared first on InvestinCannabis.com.

Published at Fri, 13 Dec 2019 16:45:00 +0000

Aleafia Health Completes $7.1M Cannabis Sale Agreement

Aleafia Health Completes $7.1M Cannabis Sale Agreement

With Illinois poised to begin adult-use cannabis sales Jan. 1, 2020, some of Chicago’s aldermen and public stakeholders are concerned that a program designed to improve social equity access for minority business owners won’t live up to its promise.

A photo depicting a room full of white men participating in the city’s dispensary-license lottery on Nov. 15 went viral, eliciting responses from those who are upset that, when the program begins, there won’t be equity in ownership for black or Latino residents—or other prospective entrepreneurs based in areas of the city disproportionately affected by prohibition-era cannabis arrests.

The owners of Chicago’s 11 medical dispensaries are all white, and theirs are the only businesses that are either licensed or allowed to apply for licenses to add adult-use sales on Jan. 1. They participated in the lottery for the chance to acquire licenses for secondary locations, and other existing medical dispensaries in surrounding areas were the remaining lottery participants vying for the chance to add stores in the city.

Because there are none of Illinois’ medical cannabis business owners are black, according to the Chicago Sun-Times, and the approaching adult-use market will be based off of the state’s medical cannabis industry, the first adult-use dispensary owners in Chicago won’t be reflective of that city’s population, says Jason Ervin, 28th Ward alderman and chairman of City Council’s 20-member Black Caucus.

That’s a problem, Ervin says, as African Americans have been disproportionately impacted by arrest and incarceration due to cannabis offenses and should be able to fully participate in the industry once it is legitimized.

“We’re going to buy today, we’re in jail today, so why can’t we have equity today?” he asks.

Ervin and the Black Caucus introduced an ordinance in October that would delay the sale of adult-use cannabis in the city until July 1, 2020, to try to get more minority ownership in the space.

“I think that to have all of this activity in the state of Illinois and to walk out to no participation, for many communities of color, I just think that’s wrong,” Ervin says. “And I think we need to work to fix it.”

The reason the room in that viral photo looked the way it did is because Illinois is distancing itself from other states in its approach to cannabis legalization. It’s issuing adult-use licenses in phases—first making them available to established medical cannabis businesses who have capital and experience adhering to regulations in the space. Then the state will open the field to others, including social equity applicants, says Toi Hutchinson, senior adviser to the governor on cannabis control.

This is an attempt at achieving social equity both in the industry and in the communities that have been hurt the most by prohibition, says Hutchinson, who played a large role in drafting Illinois’ Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act as a state senator.

In drafting the bill, the state made some concessions to the existing medical market, State Sen. Kimberly Lightford told the Chicago Sun-Times earlier this year.

David Moore, Ward 17 alderman, says he doesn’t think medical dispensaries should have been given priority in the adult-use program rollout, but he understands the state had to do what was necessary to pass the bill. Looking at the lack of current equity ownership in his city, he says, “I think right now, we need to slow the train on this in Chicago.”

Illinois designed its program to be race-neutral so that it can hold up in court, Hutchinson says. But it addresses social equity in areas where people have been the most disproportionately impacted by the war on drugs, and where many black and Latino residents live. To that end, the state created a “Disproportionately Impacted Areas” map that plays a role in determining who can be a social equity applicant.

“I think it’s important to note that you can’t go back and change the past, but you can take very aggressive steps to make sure that the future looks differently.”

– Jason Erkes, chief communications officer at Cresco Labs

“What we know about that population is that it’s 55% African American and 22% Latino that have been disproportionately impacted,” Hutchinson says. “We know that. So, we designed an application, we designed a process, we designed a system that would try to get some of those folks the ability to come into this thing.”

Illinois’ “Disproportionately Impacted Areas” shows that Chicago neighborhoods hit hardest by prohibition are on the city’s south and west sides.

People who don’t already operate medical dispensaries can apply through Jan. 1 for a conditional license to sell adult-use cannabis. Forty-seven of these conditional licenses will be available to be awarded to dispensaries in the Bureau of Labor Statistics Region of Chicago-Naperville, Elgin, according to the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR).

The state will select licenses based on a point system. Within that system, “Status as a Social Equity Applicant” alone can earn an applicant 50 points out of a total of 250, or 20%.

Illinois will put initial operators’ licensing fees into a $30-million fund that will go toward a revolving loan program for social equity applicants, Hutchinson says. “The other thing is that people typically only talk about this for dispensaries and cultivation centers,” she adds. “We added multiple more on-ramps, so the craft grower licenses, the infuser licenses, the transporter licenses.”

In Chicago, dispensaries will at first be limited to seven storefronts in each of seven different zones. Between the 11 existing medical dispensaries and 31 lottery slots already issued, the city could hand out up to 42 adult-use licenses. Then, around May 1, the state will start issuing up to 47 conditional licenses to Chicago-Naperville, Elgin. Also on May 1, Chicago may double the number of dispensaries allowed in each of its seven zones.

Cresco Labs currently operates five medical dispensaries in Illinois, including one in Chicago. That Chicago dispensary, MedMar, in the Lakeview neighborhood, will add adult-use sales on Jan. 1. Also, pending approval, Cresco will add three more dispensaries that it drew for in the Nov. 15 lottery.

Jason Erkes, chief communications officer at Cresco, says the state’s bill “is the most thoughtful piece of legislation that’s ever been crafted for adult-use cannabis.”

The bill, Erkes points out, states that the existing medical dispensaries must follow a “Social Equity Inclusion Plan.” One of these several specific plans outlined by the state is that dispensaries can host an incubator program that, according to the bill, says each participating dispensary would “provide a loan of at least $100,000” and mentor a social equity applicant for at least one year.

Cresco recently launched its own program in Illinois called Social Equity & Educational Development (SEED), which, according to a press release from the company, is “the cannabis industry’s first national social equity initiative promoting inclusion, expungement, equality, access and community engagement.” The company is incubating 150 people in roughly 35 groups on how to apply with the state for a dispensary license, Erkes says, adding that Cresco provides them coaching and pro bono legal counsel.

“I think it’s important to note that you can’t go back and change the past, but you can take very aggressive steps to make sure that the future looks differently,” Erkes says. “And that’s what this legislation does, and that’s what all the companies that are currently in this industry are committed to doing.”

“Now, if someone can show me a model for how you do it and get exactly what they’re asking us to do, show it, because it doesn’t exist.”

– Toi Hutchinson, senior adviser to the governor on cannabis control

Moore calls Chicago Illinois’ “cash cow” for the adult-use cannabis industry. “People want to be in Chicago, so if we do what we need to do to hold this up, everybody will come to the table, and there’s space where they can work and do some compromise,” he says. “And they know that they can. Right now, today, they’re getting away like a fat rat in a cheese factory at this point. And we have to, again, just slow this train down until there’s more equity that’s representative of this city.”

Other states allowed everyone to come into their adult-use programs right away, Hutchinson says. This, she adds, has resulted in one dispensary for every 6,000 people in Oregon, one for every 10,000 in Colorado, one for every 37,000 in Washington and one for every 47,000 in Colorado.

In contrast, she says, Chicago will open with one dispensary for every 424,000 residents, and if it gives out 100 licenses by early 2020, it will still only have one for every 127,000 people. This is how the state can protect market share for social equity applicants, she says, adding that it’s too early to critique inequity on day one of legalization.

“Every other state opened the doors wide open—like wide open—and then tried to backdoor equity at the city or county level,” Hutchinson says. “And what we’ve seen—it does not work. So, we have to do this differently. Now, if someone can show me a model for how you do it and get exactly what they’re asking us to do, show it, because it doesn’t exist.”

In a Dec. 4 hearing held by Chicago City Council’s Committee on Contracting Oversight and Equity, Ervin continued to speak out about a lack of current equity. With cannabis industry members present, the room had mixed opinions about the Black Caucus’ proposed delay of sales. “Of course, they want to move as expeditiously as possible,” Ervin says. “But at the same time, we want to ensure that the equity is at the forefront of all of these conversations.”

Published at Mon, 09 Dec 2019 21:58:00 +0000

Aphria Inc. Announces $80 Million Financing of Aphria Diamond

Aphria Inc. Announces $80 Million Financing of Aphria Diamond

With Illinois poised to begin adult-use cannabis sales Jan. 1, 2020, some of Chicago’s aldermen and public stakeholders are concerned that a program designed to improve social equity access for minority business owners won’t live up to its promise.

A photo depicting a room full of white men participating in the city’s dispensary-license lottery on Nov. 15 went viral, eliciting responses from those who are upset that, when the program begins, there won’t be equity in ownership for black or Latino residents—or other prospective entrepreneurs based in areas of the city disproportionately affected by prohibition-era cannabis arrests.

The owners of Chicago’s 11 medical dispensaries are all white, and theirs are the only businesses that are either licensed or allowed to apply for licenses to add adult-use sales on Jan. 1. They participated in the lottery for the chance to acquire licenses for secondary locations, and other existing medical dispensaries in surrounding areas were the remaining lottery participants vying for the chance to add stores in the city.

Because there are none of Illinois’ medical cannabis business owners are black, according to the Chicago Sun-Times, and the approaching adult-use market will be based off of the state’s medical cannabis industry, the first adult-use dispensary owners in Chicago won’t be reflective of that city’s population, says Jason Ervin, 28th Ward alderman and chairman of City Council’s 20-member Black Caucus.

That’s a problem, Ervin says, as African Americans have been disproportionately impacted by arrest and incarceration due to cannabis offenses and should be able to fully participate in the industry once it is legitimized.

“We’re going to buy today, we’re in jail today, so why can’t we have equity today?” he asks.

Ervin and the Black Caucus introduced an ordinance in October that would delay the sale of adult-use cannabis in the city until July 1, 2020, to try to get more minority ownership in the space.

“I think that to have all of this activity in the state of Illinois and to walk out to no participation, for many communities of color, I just think that’s wrong,” Ervin says. “And I think we need to work to fix it.”

The reason the room in that viral photo looked the way it did is because Illinois is distancing itself from other states in its approach to cannabis legalization. It’s issuing adult-use licenses in phases—first making them available to established medical cannabis businesses who have capital and experience adhering to regulations in the space. Then the state will open the field to others, including social equity applicants, says Toi Hutchinson, senior adviser to the governor on cannabis control.

This is an attempt at achieving social equity both in the industry and in the communities that have been hurt the most by prohibition, says Hutchinson, who played a large role in drafting Illinois’ Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act as a state senator.

In drafting the bill, the state made some concessions to the existing medical market, State Sen. Kimberly Lightford told the Chicago Sun-Times earlier this year.

David Moore, Ward 17 alderman, says he doesn’t think medical dispensaries should have been given priority in the adult-use program rollout, but he understands the state had to do what was necessary to pass the bill. Looking at the lack of current equity ownership in his city, he says, “I think right now, we need to slow the train on this in Chicago.”

Illinois designed its program to be race-neutral so that it can hold up in court, Hutchinson says. But it addresses social equity in areas where people have been the most disproportionately impacted by the war on drugs, and where many black and Latino residents live. To that end, the state created a “Disproportionately Impacted Areas” map that plays a role in determining who can be a social equity applicant.

“I think it’s important to note that you can’t go back and change the past, but you can take very aggressive steps to make sure that the future looks differently.”

– Jason Erkes, chief communications officer at Cresco Labs

“What we know about that population is that it’s 55% African American and 22% Latino that have been disproportionately impacted,” Hutchinson says. “We know that. So, we designed an application, we designed a process, we designed a system that would try to get some of those folks the ability to come into this thing.”

Illinois’ “Disproportionately Impacted Areas” shows that Chicago neighborhoods hit hardest by prohibition are on the city’s south and west sides.

People who don’t already operate medical dispensaries can apply through Jan. 1 for a conditional license to sell adult-use cannabis. Forty-seven of these conditional licenses will be available to be awarded to dispensaries in the Bureau of Labor Statistics Region of Chicago-Naperville, Elgin, according to the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR).

The state will select licenses based on a point system. Within that system, “Status as a Social Equity Applicant” alone can earn an applicant 50 points out of a total of 250, or 20%.

Illinois will put initial operators’ licensing fees into a $30-million fund that will go toward a revolving loan program for social equity applicants, Hutchinson says. “The other thing is that people typically only talk about this for dispensaries and cultivation centers,” she adds. “We added multiple more on-ramps, so the craft grower licenses, the infuser licenses, the transporter licenses.”

In Chicago, dispensaries will at first be limited to seven storefronts in each of seven different zones. Between the 11 existing medical dispensaries and 31 lottery slots already issued, the city could hand out up to 42 adult-use licenses. Then, around May 1, the state will start issuing up to 47 conditional licenses to Chicago-Naperville, Elgin. Also on May 1, Chicago may double the number of dispensaries allowed in each of its seven zones.

Cresco Labs currently operates five medical dispensaries in Illinois, including one in Chicago. That Chicago dispensary, MedMar, in the Lakeview neighborhood, will add adult-use sales on Jan. 1. Also, pending approval, Cresco will add three more dispensaries that it drew for in the Nov. 15 lottery.

Jason Erkes, chief communications officer at Cresco, says the state’s bill “is the most thoughtful piece of legislation that’s ever been crafted for adult-use cannabis.”

The bill, Erkes points out, states that the existing medical dispensaries must follow a “Social Equity Inclusion Plan.” One of these several specific plans outlined by the state is that dispensaries can host an incubator program that, according to the bill, says each participating dispensary would “provide a loan of at least $100,000” and mentor a social equity applicant for at least one year.

Cresco recently launched its own program in Illinois called Social Equity & Educational Development (SEED), which, according to a press release from the company, is “the cannabis industry’s first national social equity initiative promoting inclusion, expungement, equality, access and community engagement.” The company is incubating 150 people in roughly 35 groups on how to apply with the state for a dispensary license, Erkes says, adding that Cresco provides them coaching and pro bono legal counsel.

“I think it’s important to note that you can’t go back and change the past, but you can take very aggressive steps to make sure that the future looks differently,” Erkes says. “And that’s what this legislation does, and that’s what all the companies that are currently in this industry are committed to doing.”

“Now, if someone can show me a model for how you do it and get exactly what they’re asking us to do, show it, because it doesn’t exist.”

– Toi Hutchinson, senior adviser to the governor on cannabis control

Moore calls Chicago Illinois’ “cash cow” for the adult-use cannabis industry. “People want to be in Chicago, so if we do what we need to do to hold this up, everybody will come to the table, and there’s space where they can work and do some compromise,” he says. “And they know that they can. Right now, today, they’re getting away like a fat rat in a cheese factory at this point. And we have to, again, just slow this train down until there’s more equity that’s representative of this city.”

Other states allowed everyone to come into their adult-use programs right away, Hutchinson says. This, she adds, has resulted in one dispensary for every 6,000 people in Oregon, one for every 10,000 in Colorado, one for every 37,000 in Washington and one for every 47,000 in Colorado.

In contrast, she says, Chicago will open with one dispensary for every 424,000 residents, and if it gives out 100 licenses by early 2020, it will still only have one for every 127,000 people. This is how the state can protect market share for social equity applicants, she says, adding that it’s too early to critique inequity on day one of legalization.

“Every other state opened the doors wide open—like wide open—and then tried to backdoor equity at the city or county level,” Hutchinson says. “And what we’ve seen—it does not work. So, we have to do this differently. Now, if someone can show me a model for how you do it and get exactly what they’re asking us to do, show it, because it doesn’t exist.”

In a Dec. 4 hearing held by Chicago City Council’s Committee on Contracting Oversight and Equity, Ervin continued to speak out about a lack of current equity. With cannabis industry members present, the room had mixed opinions about the Black Caucus’ proposed delay of sales. “Of course, they want to move as expeditiously as possible,” Ervin says. “But at the same time, we want to ensure that the equity is at the forefront of all of these conversations.”

Published at Mon, 09 Dec 2019 22:02:00 +0000

Possible Scenarios for U.S. Marijuana Legalization by 2021

Possible Scenarios for U.S. Marijuana Legalization by 2021

It tightens the grip that beer, wine and spirits maker Constellation has on the pot producer, which has been suffering steep losses. Klein was made Canopy Growth chairman in October after Corona beer maker Constellation Brands sustained a big loss on its investment in the Canadian cannabis firm. He will formally take over as Canopy Growth CEO on Jan. 14.

“David is an experienced strategist with a deep understanding of how to build enduring consumer brands while leveraging operational scale across a dispersed production footprint,” Canopy Growth said in a news release. “He is a strong leader with a proven track record of developing diverse and high performing teams.”

The firm touted the new CEO’s consumer packaged goods and alcoholic beverage industry experience, strong financial orientation, and experience operating in highly regulated markets in the U.S., Canada, Mexico and Europe.

Constellation Brands has sunk $4 billion into Canopy. It is looking to secure a position of strength in light of the proposed legalization of recreation marijuana in several countries. So far marijuana stocks have failed to deliver on the hype, with their shares plummeting as a result.

Published at Mon, 09 Dec 2019 16:26:59 +0000

What Travelers Need To Know About Flying With Weed

What Travelers Need To Know About Flying With Weed

eCann Media is proud to showcase our portfolio of investments and subsidiaries. We have completed numerous investments across multiple verticals and sectors in the cannabis industry. Requesting an invitation will enable the eCann team to consider your eligibility for investment as well help us to identify the opportunities that best fit your needs and investment objectives.

Published at Mon, 02 Dec 2019 13:00:00 +0000

Can You Major In Marijuana?

Can You Major In Marijuana?

eCann Media is proud to showcase our portfolio of investments and subsidiaries. We have completed numerous investments across multiple verticals and sectors in the cannabis industry. Requesting an invitation will enable the eCann team to consider your eligibility for investment as well help us to identify the opportunities that best fit your needs and investment objectives.

Published at Thu, 05 Dec 2019 19:00:00 +0000

6 Variables To Assess When Building a CBD Brand

6 Variables To Assess When Building a CBD Brand

eCann Media is proud to showcase our portfolio of investments and subsidiaries. We have completed numerous investments across multiple verticals and sectors in the cannabis industry. Requesting an invitation will enable the eCann team to consider your eligibility for investment as well help us to identify the opportunities that best fit your needs and investment objectives.

Published at Fri, 06 Dec 2019 21:15:00 +0000

MediPharm Labs Australia Granted State Licences, Completes Construction of Specialized Production Facility

MediPharm Labs Australia Granted State Licences, Completes Construction of Specialized Production Facility

MediPharm Labs Corp. (TSX: LABS) (OTCQX: MEDIF) (FSE: MLZ) (“MediPharm Labs” or the “Company”) a global leader in specialized, research-driven cannabis extraction, distillation and purification, today announced that its subsidiary, MediPharm Labs Australia Pty. Ltd. (“MediPharm Labs Australia”), has received State Licences for cannabis substances from the Department of Health and Human Services in Victoria, Australia and completed the initial phases of construction of its specialized extraction facility in Wonthaggi.

Under these State Licences, MediPharm Labs Australia is allowed to store, test and supply cannabis for research purposes at its newly built facility. Construction of the 10,000 square foot plant began 18 months ago. The final stage of regulatory approvals is now underway and is expected in H1 2020, which will make MediPharm Labs Australia a first mover in the Australian market for the manufacture of cannabis derivative products.

“We envisioned that MediPharm Labs Australia would be a pioneering leader in the supply of high-quality, pharmaceutical-like cannabis derivative products for the domestic Australian and international export markets,” said Warren Everitt, Chief Executive Officer, Asia Pacific, MediPharm Labs. “The achievements we mark today reflect tremendously well on our domestic engineering, project management and regulatory affairs capabilities, and provide tangible evidence that our vision will soon be realized for the benefit of our customers, shareholders and the Australian economy.”

MediPharm Labs Australia was designed to have annual capacity of 75,000 kg and to replicate the high-quality standards of the Company’s Canadian production facility. It features multi-phase supercritical CO2 extraction equipment, clean rooms and testing laboratories.  Both facilities were built to achieve GMP certifications. A GMP certificate from the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration is the next priority start-up step, with the regulatory audit process already proceeding.

“Starting a business is never easy but the skilled team at MediPharm Labs Australia under Warren’s direction has made it look that way,” said Pat McCutcheon, Chief Executive Officer, MediPharm Labs. “I congratulate everyone involved for quickly bringing us to this advanced pre-production phase. We’re now starting the final countdown to commercialization of the asset.”

To mark the completion of facility construction, Mr. Everitt hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony today where Daniel Andrews, the Premier of Victoria, Australia, John Skerritt, the Deputy Secretary of the Commonwealth Department of Health, and Brett Tessari, Mayor of Wonthaggi addressed the audience.

“Victoria is continuing to lead the way in medicinal cannabis in Australia and we are proud to support MediPharm Labs in calling Wonthaggi, Gippsland its Australian home”, said Daniel Andrews, Premier of Victoria, Australia. “We’re proud to be actively attracting investment in this ground-breaking industry that will not only improve the lives of patients around the world, but also create local jobs.”

MediPharm Labs Group Milestones to Date in Australia:

  • June 18, 2018 – Breaks ground on 10,000 sq.ft. purpose-built facility, 127 km southeast of Melbourne, in Wonthaggi, Victoria.
  • Feb 21, 2019 – Signs first international private label two-year sales agreement with AusCann Operations Pty. Ltd. (“AusCann”) for cannabis concentrate to be exported to Australia from Canada; Cannabis concentrate to be used for hard-shell capsules to research and treat chronic pain.
  • Mar-Aug, 2019 – Recruits senior leadership team from leading companies within the Australian pharmaceutical industry.
  • May 21, 2019 – Receives Cannabis Manufacturing Licence from the Australian Office of Drug Control (ODC) under the Narcotic Drugs Act 1967.
  • June 24, 2019 – Announces first export of medical cannabis concentrate to Australia in accordance with Health Canada export and Australian ODC import permits.
  • Aug 1, 2019 – Wins INNOVATION AWARD at the Australian Cannabis Industry Awards, for role defining a new extraction-specialist segment in the medical cannabis industry.
  • Sept 3, 2019 – Enters a manufacturing agreement with a licensed Australian entity; Signs three multi-year supply agreements with ODC-approved cultivators (including BBS Pharmaceuticals).
  • Sept 27, 2019 – Receives multi-phase supercritical CO2 extraction equipment.
  • Oct 1, 2019 – Announces second set of larger exports of medical cannabis concentrate from Canada to Australia in accordance with Health Canada export and Australian ODC import permits.
  • Dec 5, 2019 – Receives State Licences for cannabis substances from the Department of Health and Human Services in Victoria, Australia.
  • Dec 6, 2019 – Celebrates the completion of construction of facility in Wonthaggi, Victoria.

For more detail, visit https://www.medipharmlabs.com/news/press-releases

About MediPharm Labs

Founded in 2015, MediPharm Labs specializes in the production of purified, pharmaceutical-like cannabis oil and concentrates and advanced derivative products utilizing a Good Manufacturing Practices designed facility and ISO standard built clean rooms. MediPharm Labs has invested in an expert, research driven team, state-of-the-art technology, downstream purification methodologies and purpose-built facilities with five primary extraction lines for delivery of pure, trusted and precision-dosed cannabis products for its customers. Through its wholesale and white label platforms, they formulate, process, package and distribute cannabis extracts and advanced cannabinoid-based products to domestic and international markets. As a global leader, MediPharm Labs has completed commercial exports to Australia and is nearing commercialization of its Australian extraction facility. MediPharm Labs Australia was established in 2017.

For further information, please contact:
Laura Lepore, VP, Investor Relations
Telephone: 705-719-7425 ext 216
Email: investors@medipharmlabs.com
Website: www.medipharmlabs.com

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION:

This news release contains “forward-looking information” and “forward-looking statements” (collectively, “forward-looking statements”) within the meaning of the applicable Canadian securities legislation. All statements, other than statements of historical fact, are forward-looking statements and are based on expectations, estimates and projections as at the date of this news release. Any statement that involves discussions with respect to predictions, expectations, beliefs, plans, projections, objectives, assumptions, future events or performance (often but not always using phrases such as “expects”, or “does not expect”, “is expected”, “anticipates” or “does not anticipate”, “plans”, “budget”, “scheduled”, “forecasts”, “estimates”, “believes” or “intends” or variations of such words and phrases or stating that certain actions, events or results “may” or “could”, “would”, “might” or “will” be taken to occur or be achieved) are not statements of historical fact and may be forward-looking statements. In this news release, forward-looking statements relate to, among other things, commercialization and GMP certification of the Australian facility and timing thereof, use of cannabis concentrate by AusCann, performance of the agreements as intended and disclosed herein; expected processing capacity of the Australian facility and production of active pharmaceutical ingredients and cannabinoid-based medicines. Forward-looking statements are necessarily based upon a number of estimates and assumptions that, while considered reasonable, are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors which may cause the actual results and future events to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Such factors include, but are not limited to: general business, economic, competitive, political and social uncertainties; the inability of MediPharm Labs to obtain adequate financing; the delay or failure to receive regulatory approvals; and other factors discussed in MediPharm Labs’ filings, available on the SEDAR website at www.sedar.com. There can be no assurance that such statements will prove to be accurate, as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on the forward-looking statements and information contained in this news release. Except as required by law, MediPharm Labs assumes no obligation to update the forward-looking statements of beliefs, opinions, projections, or other factors, should they change.

Photos accompanying this announcement are available at:

https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/a65db3aa-1bbe-4715-8d2b-ab97eb10b67a

https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/60c608a6-dd13-4137-a9a0-f1f37c9ffb45

https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/91b15b24-b003-4b11-8779-76dda3116ab2

Primary Logo

Plaque Unveiling

To mark the official opening of MediPharm Labs Australia on December 6, 2019 by the Hon. Daniel Andrews MP, Premier of Victoria, a plaque is unveiled. Pictured (L to R): Jordan Crugnale, Member of Parliament for Bass, Daniel Andrews, Premier of Victoria, Warren Everitt, CEO Asia Pacific, MediPharm Labs, Brett Tessari, Mayor of Wonthaggi, and John Skerritt, Deputy Secretary, Department of Health.

Ribbon Cutting

To mark the official opening of MediPharm Labs Australia in Wonthaggi, Victoria on December 6, 2019, Warren Everritt, CEO Asia Pacific (L) and the Hon. Daniel Andrews MP, Premier of Victoria (R) complete the ribbon cutting ceremony.

Touring the Facility

At the official opening of MediPharm Labs Australia on December 6, 2019 in Wonthaggi, Victoria, James Lee, Head of Project Management Office, Asia Pacific, tours the Hon. Daniel Andrews MP, Premier of Victoria (R) and other dignitaries through the specialized extraction facility.

Published at Fri, 06 Dec 2019 13:21:33 +0000

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